Friday, March 1, 2019

Japanese Internment During World War II


During World War II, the Japanese Americans on the West Coast of the United States were removed from their communities and interned in camps spread around the counttry. We have read the book Journey to Topaz, we have discussed what lead up to the  internment, and we have had a field trip where former internees spoke to you about their experience. Additionally, you were able to see many artifacts at the California Museum from the time of internment. 

For this blog post, you get to give your thoughts about internment. Simply put, what do you think about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II? Think about what happened, form an opinion or two, and let that be your big idea. Then, you can use your own thoughts and factual details to support your opinion. You may write as many paragraphs as you think it will take for you to fully express your thoughts. We also read Number the Stars where there was a call for human decency all over the world. If you wish, you can discuss human decency along with this topic. Be thoughtful, and be complete so that others reading your post will learn something about Japanese Internment. 

As usual, please take some time to read others' thoughts and comment on their work.

109 comments:

  1. My Feelings About The Japanese Internment Camps

    The Japanese-Americans’ internment in these so called camps was unfair. The bombing of Pearl Harbor was used as an excuse for the Americans to get the Japanese out of society. It dates back all the way to the California Gold Rush. Many Americans had always wanted to get rid of the Japanese people in their country, and this was the perfect opportunity for them.

    When President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, that gave him permission to move the Japanese-Americans to the internment camps. More than half of the Japanese-Americans who were interned were kids. How would kids work for the Japanese government? Why would the government blame 120,000 Japanese-Americans for the actions of 353 planes bombing Pearl Harbor?


    In Hawaii, only over 1000 Japanese-Americans were interned out of 160,000 Japanese-Americans. A lot of those Japanese-Americans worked the sugarcane plantations, so if the government interned them, they would lose money. The sugar plantation money mattered a lot to the government.

    The guards in the watch towers said they were protecting the camps, but their guns were pointing inward, not outward. Since the internment camps were in rural areas, where would the people escape to? Eight people got shot in the internment camps.Two of them tried to escape. The other six people probably just reached out for something and got shot by the guards. The guards orders were to shoot any Japanese-Americans who tried to escape. For those people who were just reaching out for something, the guards should have seen what they were doing before they shot them.


    By 1943, the government started to let some people leave for work, school, or the military, but they would not let them return to the West Coast. I think that is unfair. If they could leave the internment camps, why couldn’t they go back to their homes? By 1944, they were released from the internment camps and allowed to go home.

    It took the government 40 years to apologize to the Japanese-Americans. I can’t believe the government didn’t realize this was a mistake sooner. In 1988, all the Japanese-Americans who were alive that were in the internment camps received a letter from the government. Inside the envelope was an apology and a check for 20,000 dollars. The people who received it didn’t really care about the check. They cared about the apology. 20,000 dollars wouldn’t make up for a house, a car, a business and more.

    After the 9/11 attack, some people said that the government should round up the Muslims in internment camps because the terrorists that were responsible for the attack were Muslims. Others said they shouldn’t do it because they did it to the Japanese-Americans and it was a mistake. The government learned from their past mistake so they wouldn’t do it again. I hope you feel the same way I do about the internment camps. These people suffered and lost 4 years of their life. They did not deserve it. No other race or ethnicity should be treated this way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done Faisal! You set a good example for others to follow here. You have great facts to support the ideas you are proving. Impressive knowledge about internment here-

      Delete
  2. Great Job Faisal your blog is a great piece of work I can tell you put a lot of effort in to it and I think you deserve a 4+

    ReplyDelete
  3. Japanese Internment



    Personally I think that the U.S. government overreacted with fear that the Japanese in Japan and on the west coast, they thought that they were going to overthrow the West Coast and then then the U.S.. I really think that the US messed up by putting them in the internment camps for 4 miserable years.

    The reason I hate the government at that time is because they put all the Japanese along the west coast in internment camps, they did this because they were to scared that the Japanese would overthrow the government. I don’t think they needed to do this because two reports, one from the FBI, and one from a newspaper company, went out saying if Japanese were loyal to Japan or America, both came back saying that almost all of the Japanese were loyal to America. It is mostly Dewitt’s fault that the all the Japanese along the west coast got interend because he convinced the president that interining them is for their own safety. More than 110,000 Japanese got interned because of Dewitt.

    I don’t like the U.S. government because they didn’t need to do this, they just did it because the Japanese have been hated ever since the beging of the gold rush in 1849. They have been hated because of their race and what they look like. This was entirely unnecessary because they were afraid that Japan would bomb again to distract the U.S. so they could take it over. I just think that the people of the U.S. wanted to get Japanese out of society ever since the gold rush. The U.S. didn’t take the Japanese out of Hawaii because they were working the sugar cane farms there, they didn’t do this because of economics.

    I personally think that the U.S. government periuly did this to put the Japanese out society. They also did this to break them down and tried to get them to go back to Japan so they wouldn’t ‘’bother’’ the US citizens and would leave.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You really state your opinion

      Delete
    2. Great job Wesley!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. There are some good ideas here and you facts do well to support your ideas. However, there was no newspaper report that showed the loyalty of the Japanese. One report was from the FBI and the other was done by Curtis Munson. Munson was hired by the government to see if the Japanese were loyal to Japan or America.

      Delete
  4. Japanese Internment Camps

    The Japanese Internment Camps were unacceptable, and in my opinion what the American government did was very wrong.
    On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, and declared war on the United States. The attack made many Americans angry. Also, they blamed the Japanese-Americans for what happened in Hawaii. Soon, fear got the best of the Americans, and they started to discriminate against the Japanese-Americans. In February 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This order said that all Japanese who lived in some parts of the of the country could be taken out of those areas for any reason and sent to Internment Camps. All of the people that were taken were in the western United States. This was where most lived at that time. Most of the Japanese-Americans were born in America and were citizens. In order to prevent the Japanese from moving to other areas and not being interned, the government stopped the Japanese from taking money out of their bank accounts. The Japanese only had ten days to pack and leave their homes. Plus, they could only take what they could carry to the Internment Camps. This was one of the many discriminatory acts in history. In my opinion, discriminating was and is very wrong. For me it is very hard to believe that my country did this to the Japanese-Americans. Their liberty and freedom were taken from them, and they were accused unfairly of not being loyal to their country.
    In the Internment Camps, there was no privacy. In the restrooms, there were no walls separating the stalls so the children, and adults didn’t have to see each other using the restroom. Also, in the barracks there was a foot of wall missing so that everything said would be heard. Even the whole block could hear people talking, not yelling, talking, in indoor voices. The Japanese-Americans lived in these horrible conditions for four years! The Japanese-Americans did nothing but still got a horrible four-year punishment. This unfair treatment probably had a huge impact on the rest of their lives. If I was interned just because I was Japanese-American, then I would be feel sad and as if i didn’t belong to this country. This is not ethical. This isn’t ethical because everyone in America has constitutional rights. I think that the Japanese Internment Camps was a dark spot in American history, like Jewish Concentration Camps Idse the word were a dark spot in German history. The weird thing was, it took the government 40 years to apologize to the Japanese-Americans! It took them long enough! But, there was some human decency in that, fortunately. They at least apologized, and gave every family $20,000, to repay for the four years in camps. But, some of the Japanese didn’t want the money. They only wanted the apology. They said that four years in the camps, that were made for some idiotic reason, couldn’t be repaid.
    We should have a world of decency, and if this was supposed to be a part of the decent world, we have failed. This act was not even close to human decency! War and death and discrimination and hate should not happen. Those are the things that are opposite of decency in this world. If everyone was kind to each other, around the world, then maybe the environment would have more of a chance to have a decent world. If two people get angry with each other, and they just declare war for some reason, with the agreement of the government for some reason, this should be pointed out and stopped. We have to help others be descent. Also, if we want a whole world of kindness. Never use the color or appearance of peoples’ faces to change your feeling of them.
    Unfortunately, these discriminatory acts from the early 1940s are being repeated to this day, and still haven’t been eliminated. This example in history should be used today as a border in between what should be done and what should not be done. The Japanese Internment Camps were cruel, and very unfair.

    Written by Alejandro

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done, Alejandro! You have a great analysis of the issue, and the ideas you have expressed show your thoughts based on facts. Very strong blog post!

      Delete
    2. Thank you Mr. La Marr, I had hoped you would enjoy my blog, I did this all in one day. Also, I hope I made a good impression on how horrible and un-necessary this act was. This act really disgusted me and made me feel extremely bad for the Japanese-Americans, so I really tried to put in my strong and disappointed emotions toward the government when they did this. Thank you again.

      Delete
  5. what the heck? it didn't space the different paragraphs... huh...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not know why it did not space right

      Delete
    2. I feel like I got some info wrong. U feel me?

      Delete
    3. Great job Alejandro, I loved how you added human decency!!

      Delete
    4. NO ETAI, I RLY DONT FELL U BRO

      Delete
    5. and thxs Faisal

      Delete
    6. cool Edan, I know you don't know

      Delete
  6. nice job to everyone! Lengthy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. THE WAR

    The U.S government betrayed their own citizens and defaced the Constitution by hastily building internment camps for 120,000 Japanese Americans who lived horrible lives.



    On December 7, 1941,the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. I haven't read why they did this yet but rumors, of course, were spread that some Japanese Americans knew about the attack and helped the Japanese military. The FBI knew these rumors were false yet said nothing. That gets me real mad. The government must have wanted these people imprisoned for a long time. After a while signs began to say things like,
    “Free shaves for Japs” and “not responsible for accidents”. That means that person would cut or badly wound a Japanese person's head and shave all their hair off. In 1942 president Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066; saying that all Japanese Americans on the west coast would be interned to camps. I see why the government would do this. They may have gotten scared and people will do things they aren't totally aware of.

    There was no PRIVACY or RESPECT in the internment camps. The Japanese were the only ones with respect. The camps were not finished so they had no heaters, no doors for the showers, and no rooftop cover for their houses. The Americans treated these people like dirt. If an internee stuck his or her hand out of the barbed wire they could get shot. SHOT!!! But why? Fear. They were scared of these people. So they used the internment camps to break them down.

    The Japanese Americans were so loyal to their country they went to war when they could, with hopes of getting their families out. Didn't happen, but they tried. They were so loyal to this country that they would accept the most dangerous missions and they could have possibly died.

    Everyone was in the internment camps together. Even babies were involved. The children felt ashamed of the fact that they were in the internment camps. The kids had a hard time coming back into civilization even though they were American citizens. People still hated them. Those people were probably mad at the government for letting them out in 1944. The government finally apologized for what they did (or at least tried) and gave them $20,000 to buy homes. The money was okay but the apology was what counted, it pleased the Japanese Americans.





    The barbed wire in the camps gave a bad name to the United States of America. The national anthem, which has a verse that says, "the land of the free and the home of brave” was proved otherwise by the Internment of the Japanese Americans.











    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like your topic sentence

      Delete
    2. I loved your conclusion about the anthem Makhai!!

      Delete
    3. Amazing job Makhai I love every part of it especially your third paragraph!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    4. Your introduction and you conclusion are both very powerful! You put good thought into how to begin the piece so the reader is interested, and how to end it so that the reader comes away with a strong idea bout the topic. Well done, Makhai!

      Delete
  8. What the United States government did to the people of Japanese ancestry was completely and totally wrong in so many ways. The government blamed all Japanese for the bombing of Pearl Harbor and put the Japanese living on the West Coast into internment camps.

    It all started with Executive Order 9066….. Executive Order 9066 was signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This order said that all Japanese living on the West Coast had to be moved into internment camps. Even if the Japanese were American citizens, which most were, they still had to be moved into internment camps. Most of the Japanese were loyal to America. 110,000 to 120,000 Japanese people were interned. The government only interned the Japanese on the West Coast, not the East Coast. There were not a lot of Japanese on the East Coast. The government says they were only interning the Japanese on the West Coast because they were close to Japan and could be helping the Japanese army. Really they were just coming up with an excuse to intern the Japanese. They wanted to intern the Japanese all along.

    America was not the only country to intern Japanese people. Canada soon followed, relocating 21,000 of its Japanese residents from its West Coast. Mexico enacted its own version. Eventually 2,264 more people of Japanese descent were removed from Peru, Brazil, Chili, and Argentina to the United States. The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Pearl Harbor is in Hawaii. Hawaii belongs to the United States. The United States government has a case to argue. Canada and Mexico have no business interning Japanese. Japan declared war on the United States not the United States, Canada, and Mexico!!!

    On December 7, 1942, hours after Pearl Harbor was bombed, the FBI rounded up 1,291 Japanese people who were religious and community leaders. The FBI arrested them and froze all their assets. In January 1943, these leaders were transferred to facilities located in Montana, New Mexico, and North Dakota. Many of the people put into these facilities were not able to contact their families. Most of the people put into these facilities had families. The United States government acted horribly. They wouldn’t let Japanese talk to their own families. The FBI arrested 1,291 Japanese people without evidence. I think if the Japanese people say they did not help the Japanese army they mean it. Some even joined the army to show that they were loyal to the United States.

    Each of the internment camps was like its own town. In these towns there were work facilities, schools, and post offices. These facilities also had farmland for keeping livestock and growing food. All of these farmlands, schools, and post offices were surrounded by a barbed wire fence. They were not just surrounded by a barbed wire fence, there were also guard towers. In the guard towers there were men armed with guns. They said they were trying to protect the people on the inside, but their guns were pointing inside the camp at the Japanese people. At the internment camp in Topaz a man went too close to the perimeter and was shot and killed. Two months later a couple was killed for the same reason. I am glad they had schools for the children and jobs for the grown-ups. The Japanese that were shot did nothing wrong. They were just taking a stroll by the fence. They never tried to escape. They were probably not going to try to escape. They were innocent!!!!!

    The United States government mistreated innocent people. All Japanese were blamed for the bombing of Pearl Harbor. What the United States did to the Japanese will leave a huge mark on history. I really hope the United States government learns from their mistakes and does not do this to another group of immigrants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can tell that you took your time on this blog Edan.

      Delete
    2. I agree with your last line and hope that the government never makes this mistake again. You have some good points in here, Edan.

      Delete
  9. Japanese Internment was horrible. It ruined and sometimes ended the lives of many Japanese-Americans. It really shows how much a country can do when they are scared for their people and have been in a feud for centuries.
    I strongly believe that Japanese Internment was wrong. To start, these Internment camps were breaking these people down and that was the point of it. The door of each barrack was at least 1 foot from the ceiling so everyone could hear everything. This was to break them down. Also I think one of the only reasons Japanese-Americans were put into Internment in the first place, was because Japan had been the enemy for centuries; so when the Japanese started to come to the United States they were successful and some Americans did not like that. After Pearl Harbor was bombed in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, that was an excuse to intern the Japanese-Americans but also now the United States knew Japan was coming and that it was the right time to attack. Another way the United States tried to break the Japanese-Americans was the fact that they had to live in horse stalls and in old race tracks. They had to line up for dinner which was canned sausage, and they had to line up to clean their dishes. After a long day they got to sleep on a cot in rooms seperated by thin army blankets. Japanese Internment was a disgrace to United States history and still is today.
    I also believe that the United States was completely fine with lying to these Japanese-Americans.
    Sergeant Dewitt was the man who pushed Franklin D. Roosevelt to sign Executive Order 9066 which sent “enemy aliens” (Japanese) to the Internment. The sad thing was up to 110,000 Japanese-Americans were sent to the Internment camps. Dewitt manipulated Franklin D. Roosevelt by saying that white people were going to come after them and that they needed to be away from society. So if it was for the Japanese-Americans’ safety, why were the guns in the guard towers pointed toward them instead of outward where the enemies would be? This was a question many Japanese-Americans asked themselves when they were told this and I would have done the same. The men with guns in the guard towers would shoot people who were trying to “escape” when they probably didn’t know they were passing the premises anyway! Also their were two reports put out. They were asking Japanese-Americans if they were loyal to America or Japan and most said they were loyal to America, yet Dewitt influenced President Roosevelt.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree that Japanese internment ruined some lives. Great job Nassali!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
  10. How are these people even going to rise up when they have no weapons?
    Some Americans thought that the Japanese-Americans were going to rise up or escape when they had nothing in the camps. They had enough torture in the camps as it was. They were broken down and had lost all hope. But the American government kept pounding! They blacked out their letters, so it went through a secret organization that would black out anything that would “ruin” national security. But the people on the outside of the barbed wire did the best they could to help. They would take the Japanese-Americans’ things and pets. They would send letters and food to cheer them up. There was only so much they could do, sadness and bitterness welled up inside of some of these people so when they left the camps they still had scars.
    Human Decency was a big part missing from the entire World War II and many other wars.
    Human Decency is honesty, treating everyone equally, and that never happened in World War II. There was discrimination and dishonesty written all over it! A way to make things better would have been to have only one person from each army and then those two fight, like the Native Americans did. Then thousands of people don’t die in battle. The Japanese-Americans came for a better home in America yet they were treated worst of all ever since the Gold Rush. War may seem like a bloody thing but it doesn’t have to be, not with Human Decency.
    The American government seemed to intern Japanese-Americans out of fear and hatred.
    The American government put a huge scar on many Japanese-Americans and American history. The fact that the government was willing to put their own citizens in Internment was ghastly and hurtful knowing that I am American. I am very proud of my heritage but knowing what America did to these people scares me. The National Anthem says, “the land of the free” yet it was the complete opposite. Most of those Interned were Nisei, second generation Japanese-Americans. They were citizens and were still interned. That was breaking the United States Constitution.
    The National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance are lies when it comes to racial differences in general.
    The National Anthem says, “land of the free.” Well if it was so free, why were these people put in hideous prisons that weren’t even completely built? Why were these people having to stand in line to wash their dishes and to eat dreadful food? Why when they were let out of Internment they were shot, had bad signs about them, and could barely find jobs? If they did find jobs they wouldn’t fulfill the amount of brain power these people had. Signs put up said things like, “I’d rather do business with a Jap than an American” from a funeral home; meaning that they would rather see a Japanese dead than an American. The Pledge of Allegiance says, “Indivisible, with liberty and justice for ALL.” Meaning all people, from all around the world not just from America. “Indivisible” means unable to be divided or separated, unable to be discriminated. That is not happening in the United States yet that is what the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem say. So as a country we need to implement that fully.


    ReplyDelete
  11. Everyone has their own opinions and that needs to be understood.
    I will always believe in Japanese Internment being wrong. But other people might not think the same way I do and that is ok. That is one of the lessons that needs to be taught. Everyone has room to improve, so that needs to be accepted. As difficult as it may be as a home for many, the United States needs to be United as in the name. Japanese Internment was a struggle for many and scared many others. It was a horrid part of United States History and always will be. But there are always people who disagree, so it wasn’t all Americans that were discriminating, just some of them, but that some made a huge impact. Opinions are like paper you can catch it and rip it, or catch it and write on it. The American Government ripped it to shreds, and now they are trying to tape it back together, but the tape is running out.
    We learn history to learn from the mistakes that have been made in the past. When 9/11 happened some people wanted to put Muslims in Internment camps since Muslim terrorists were responsible. That would be taking us right back to where we were in 1942. So I think those people were basically saying Japanese Internment was fine so let's just do it again; but this time we know that we are breaking the National Anthem and the Constitution and the Pledge of Allegiance. That is not right in any way just like the Internment of Japanese Americans. No one ethnicity, no one person should have to face the hardships of discrimination in the way Japanese-Americans did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Outstanding job thinking about this topic, Nassali. You have made many excellent points and have done well to show just how unjust the decision was to intern the Japanese Americans. Fear makes people do strange things, and sometimes unethical things.

      Delete
  12. The Japanese internment camps were a abhorrent mistake made by the United States government. 120,000 innocent people were imprisoned for being Japanese. As someone whose close friend is a Japanese American, I think that it was a horrendous misconception for these loyal citizens of America to be imprisoned for something they couldn’t control.


    The bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, occurred on December 7, 1941. Basically, what happened was this. Japan bombed Hawaii. Many people disliked the Japanese, and this was the perfect excuse to get rid of them. Many businesses put up racist anti-Japanese signs. As someone who knows several Japanese Americans, the thought of this saddens me very much. Now, fast forward to February of 1942. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066, after finally being convinced by General DeWitt, who insisted that all Japanese or people related to anyone Japanese deserved to be interned. President Roosevelt’s signature gave DeWitt authorization to move all the Japanese Americans on the west coast to internment camps.


    Life in the Camps was brutal. The unfinished barracks lacked heat, air conditioning, stoves, and sheetrock on the walls. Even then, these innocent people were expected, no, required to live in these places. The food was atrocious, and the camps were in rural areas. They were at least allowed visitors from other places. But visitors were only allowed during visiting hours. The rest of the time, the internees were forced to come up with a pass time. Those who were sent away were told they could only bring what they can carry, so games like marbles were common. Women made the best of what they could find by organizing sticks into pretty decorations. Beautiful art and poetry came from the camps. There were baton twirling leagues for the girls, and baseball leagues for the boys. Gardens and trees were planted. Some camps had toy libraries, where you could check out toys. There were schools established later on, with teachers hired from inside the camps. This shows these people’s creativity in this dreadful time in their lives. The worst part in my opinion were the bathrooms. Although there were segregated men and women’s bathrooms, the stalls and showers had no walls! Some people would put paper bags over their heads so they couldn’t see people looking at them. The Japanese Americans were stripped of their dignity in these camps!


    Despite all this torture, the Japanese Americans were loyal to their country. Before the camps, the police and FBI ran two tests on whether or not the Japanese Americans were loyal to America or Japan. Both tests came up with the same answer, these people are loyal to America. War hysteria and fear, however, made our leaders think otherwise. However, our leaders later on did acknowledge their mistake. Ronald Reagan sent an apology note to every last person that had been interned if they were still alive. The note also came with $20,000. However, some people didn’t even want the check. It was the apology note people wanted. They wanted to hear the government admit their mistake. After all this time, the Japanese were still good citizens.

    The thing that irritates me is that there was a huge amount of Japanese Americans in Hawaii, but they weren’t interned. I think that would be because they were working the sugarcane plantations, which was a large source of income for the United States. People disliked them because they were so successful. Their farming skills allowed them to take a bad piece of farmland and make a good farm out of it. The reason they were there is because no one wanted to work the sugarcane plantations. So the United States allowed the Japanese into Hawaii so that they could work the plantations. The thing is, when the Japanese became so successful, others complained about the Japanese stealing their jobs, even though those jobs hadn’t been wanted in the first place. That is what I meant by how people disliked the Japanese. The large amount of Japanese Americans in Hawaii weren't interned because of economics.

    ReplyDelete
  13. This can all connect to the topic of human decency and how we treat others. My teacher once asked us, why do we learn history? We answered him by saying something along the lines of, “So we don’t make the same mistake twice.” I think this story of Japanese internment can be considered a lesson in human decency. We discriminated against these people, and it is looked back upon as a huge mistake. We can prevent that from happening if we are decent to one another. We don’t have to join hands and sing or all love each other for all eternity, but we could at least be decent to one another, and not fight as often. It all could start with you. To quote Mother Teresa, “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the water to create many ripples.” If everyone who reads this is humanly decent, their effort will spread to others, and there will hopefully be a ripple effect. If someone in the government stood up for the Japanese Americans, there could have been a lot of time saved for the government to do other things. Human decency could have saved tons of Japanese Americans from living part of their life practically in prison. If all of us just spread human decency, we all could eventually stop wars. We can all be humanly decent and make the world a better place.


    The Japanese Internment Camps were a ghastly mistake, and I think they were highly offensive to the Japanese Americans. 120,000 People were imprisoned, and all of them, men, women, and children, were Japanese. They were unfairly discriminated against and I hope no one else has to experience that in this country or the world again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amazing topic paragraph aleeza, lots of power!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. You included many details in this blog Aleeza. Great job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. Outstanding analysis of the topic Aleeza. You have used the facts about internment to create your own thoughts, and you have voiced them with strength. I really like the section about human decency, and I agree with you fully. This is excellent!

      Delete
  14. I think that the Japanese Internment Camps were cruel, harsh, and barbarous. I think that the camps were cruel for only a small amount of the Japanese that blew up Pearl Harbor. Also even some Japanese from inland might have helped destroy up Pearl Harbor.

    I would rather the people that are working at the camps such as guards be interned in the camps. I think they deserve this treatment of being in the camps for their misjudgement about the Japanese. If the American people wanted the Japanese interned then maybe they should be interned themselves. The Japanese should not be treated so bad if not all of them destroyed Pearl Harbor.

    I also that the guards and others should have been treated as dreadfully and horrid as the Japanese. They mistreated the Japanese by if they wanted to get something 1-2 feet outside they were shot. The Japanese people only got paid a max of $19.For the American Government did not want the Japanese people in the camps to get paid more than the people in the military.

    If the Americans like the Japanese to be stuck in a stone-hearted, monstrous, unnatural environment for four harsh years maybe they should be stuck in a camp for four years. They also get mistreated by the American Government for the camps they were put in did not have walls in the bathroom. Also the Japanese that were put in the camps did not have separation from the room next to them, their separation was normally a cloth or blanket from room to room. I could not imagine a thin piece cloth separating my house from the neighbors house.

    This is the end of my opinion blog about the ruthless internment camps.
    I think that the Japanese Internment Camps were cruel, harsh, and barbarous. I think that the camps were cruel for only a small amount of the Japanese that blew up Pearl Harbor. Also even some Japanese from inland might have helped destroy up Pearl Harbor.

    I would rather the people that are working at the camps such as guards be interned in the camps. I think they deserve this treatment of being in the camps for their misjudgement about the Japanese. If the American people wanted the Japanese interned then maybe they should be interned themselves. The Japanese should not be treated so bad if not all of them destroyed Pearl Harbor.

    I also that the guards and others should have been treated as dreadfully and horrid as the Japanese. They mistreated the Japanese by if they wanted to get something 1-2 feet outside they were shot. The Japanese people only got paid a max of $19.For the American Government did not want the Japanese people in the camps to get paid more than the people in the military.

    If the Americans like the Japanese to be stuck in a stone-hearted, monstrous, unnatural environment for four harsh years maybe they should be stuck in a camp for four years. They also get mistreated by the American Government for the camps they were put in did not have walls in the bathroom. Also the Japanese that were put in the camps did not have separation from the room next to them, their separation was normally a cloth or blanket from room to room. I could not imagine a thin piece cloth separating my house from the neighbors house.

    This is the end of my opinion blog about the ruthless internment camps.


    By BRYAN

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. your last paragraph really sums everything up beautifully!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I agree with you that internment was harsh and cruel Bryan. Great job!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. You've done well to express strong opinions based on the facts of the topic, Bryan. Can you imagine being a person who worked in the camps but didn't believe in what was happening? That would be difficult.

      Delete
  15. During World War II, people were depressed while living at the Japanese internment camps. There was not much privacy, terrible living conditions, and not many choices for food. In the latrines there wasn’t much privacy. For example, there were no walls built in between the toilets or the showers. Also, the toilets and showers were not placed far from the other ones. Another detail about the latrines is that the sinks were horse troughs. At the barracks, the Japanese had to use mattresses with hay in them. Using mattresses filled with hay wasn’t comfortable for the Japanese. Besides the poor living conditions at the barracks, the Japanese mostly ate the same thing everyday at the mess hall. That is why the Japanese internment camps were depressing during World War II.

    - Emily Zhang

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like how you capitalized on the no privacy aspect of it. Really showing the government flaws. Great topic sentence!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I like how you put how living in the internment camps had terrible living conditions.

      Delete
    3. I like your topic sentence Emily!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    4. I agree that the people were likely depressed at the camps. Hopefully, they didn't stay that way for their whole time in the camps. Well organized ideas, Emily.

      Delete
  16. World War II, Japanese Internment

    The Japanese Internment was horrible but a crucial part of American history. The United States tried weakened the Japanese by putting Japanese Americans on the West Coast to Internment Camps.
    This Japanese Act made America look bad. Why would one’s own country put people behind barbed wires? Well, the American government did that because Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in Oahu, and they thought the Japanese Americans were going to rise up and take over America. So they gathered all the Japanese Americans on the West Coast to assembly centers and then to internment camps. Some assembly centers were horse racetracks, and the Japanese had to live in horse stalls! The internment camps were in rural areas, sometimes in harsh climates that the Japanese were not used to. It would be horrible to be locked in a 1 mile squared camp with no privacy. How would the Americans feel if the Japanese did that to them?
    The internment camps were all over the United States and were not finished when the Japanese came. The camps were designed to weaken the Japanese. The camps were, like I said, in rural areas and climates that the Japanese weren’t used to. There were guard towers on the corners of the camps that were supposed to be “protecting” the Japanese but were facing into the camp, not out. Some of the Japanese were shot! The bathrooms had no doors between stalls. That meant the Japanese had no privacy. Women had to put bags over their heads so they won’t see the person in the bathroom and they won’t see her.
    I am on the Japanese’s side. If I were a Japanese American, I would wonder why my country would put me in this prison-like place. At least the Japanese made the most out of there stay there. The Japanese had made furniture out of produce crates. To be considered an alien and everyone else thinks they are would be horrible. America did the wrong thing and when they released the Japanese, they sent $20,000 and a note that apologized. The note meant more to the Japanese than the check. That would never pay off for how long they were in the camps.
    The Japanese Internment was horrible America did to the Japanese Americans. That act was a crucial part of American history and will be remembered.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the questions you asked at the start of paragraph two, great questions!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I like your topic sentence!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. You have some good details here, Sean, to prove that the internment was horrible. What do you mean by crucial? I am curious about that!

      Delete
  17. Japanese Internment


    I think Japanese Internment was horrible. It was very unfair and cruel. It was unfair because we were imprisoning our own citizens and only the ones that looked different than caucasians of our country. We were prejudiced against Japanese American people and we treated them like they were animals. We were labeling them guilty and almost all Japanese Americans were not guilty of spying on America. We were racist to have done that to them because they are us, they just look different than African Americans and Caucasian Americans and Hispanic Americans. Japanese-American people did nothing to harm Americans, but we put them in prison for looking like Japanese people.
    Japanese Internment was cruel. It was cruel because the United States government and many other Americans didn’t give Japanese American people very many rights. They didn’t allow them to vote, get money out of their bank accounts when going to the camps, or get jobs outside of the barbed wire of the camps. The National Anthem says that America is “the land of the free”, but at that time Japanese Americans were anything but free. The National Anthem also says that our country has “liberty and justice for all”, but that was not true at this time either. The Soldiers who were supposedly guarding the camps had their guns pointed at the camps instead of being pointed out of the camps to guard the Japanese Americans. Also in the camps Japanese American people were fed terrible food, like canned sausage. When someone in the camp went past the barbed wire fence marking the camp’s borders, that person was shot and killed. The camps had public latrines with no walls so no one had any privacy there.
    The United States Government gave each Japanese American 20,000 dollars to make a living, but most Japanese Americans refused the money until they got an apology from the United States Government. It took 40 years for them to apologize.
    I think that putting 120,000 Japanese American people in prison was terribly wrong and hope that everyone else thinks this too. They should have rights just like we do, because they are people just like everybody else and they should have been able to do what they wanted to do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great last paragraph to sum things up!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I agree with you that Japanese internment was cruel Eli. Great job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. That was from Nari.

      Delete
    4. Well done, Eli. Your first paragraph does well to outline the situation. You have used good facts to support your opinions. The writing is well organized and flows smoothly. Good work!

      Delete
  18. After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1942, the United States Government put over 110,000 Japanese Americans mostly living in the west coast in internment camps. I think this was very wrong. It was racially discriminatory of the United States Government to intern the Japanese Americans. First, it was Japan who was responsible for the bombing, not the innocent Japanese Americans who lived in the United States. It was wrong for the United States Government to punish the Japanese Americans, who were only related to Japan by race and had nothing to do with the bombing itself.
    The internees were given short notice to leave for a camp that usually was in a remote area out of states. They were allowed to take only what they could carry. When I look at my bedroom, if I was told to pack and leave quickly, I couldn’t have easily decided what to pack and what to leave behind. I have so many things that I treasure and need. I can only imagine how sad and scared the internees must have felt. In the camps, the internees lived in harsh conditions. They had no bathroom privacy and slept on mattresses of hay. They were served unhealthy, starchy food such as sausage, potatoes and rice. The camps were surrounded with barbed wire. Internees wandered outside the wire were shot by soldiers in the guard towers. I think the Japanese Americans interned were punished unjustly and unfairly because they were not the ones who did the bombing.
    I am glad that, after more than 40 years later, United States Government finally apologized to the internees and paid back money. But some internees said the apology was more important than the money received. Some internees said, “This money I received is an insult. It reminds me of the bad times I had in the internment camps.” So, some refused the money. This shows wounds on the heart is deeper than other losses.
    I think of our national anthem which refers United States as “the land of free, and the home of the brave”, but this was untrue to the interned Japanese Americans, and also is still untrue to Americans experiencing social injustice because of race, culture or religion. Also our pledge of allegiance says, “…indivisible, liberty and justice for all.” This part is far from being true because there is still so much racial discrimination and injustice to minorities from all around the world.
    Human decency is something that we, as humans, must strive for. It was something the government could not achieve, and still cannot achieve. But let us, as fellow human beings, all try to be kind and respectful to one another. Liberty and justice for all is still a long way to go, but we can all do our part to treat each other with kindness and respect, and value each human life with human decency. Human decency is something we do not have for everybody everywhere, but it is something we can all strive for, today and forever.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first paragraph really intrigued me. Great opener!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I can tell that you put a lot of thought into this blog Amy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Great job!!!

      Delete
    3. Great ideas to show your opinions, Amy. You put a good amount of thought into the topic of internment, and your final paragraph is a great way to end the piece. We seem to have missed the mark on human decency during the time of internment.

      Delete
  19. I think the the the government made a horrible mistake when they forced the Japanese Americans into internment camps. The government should not have done this to their own citizens. The government put innocent people into prison camps.

    The Japanese Americans did nothing to deserve being put into unfinished camps where they potentially lost their pride. The Japanese had no running water no privacy in the bathrooms or the showers. The barracks they were put in had no real walls or roofs.
    The government said the camps were for the Japanese were protecting the Japanese from the other citizens, yet the guard’s guns were pointed inward not outward. In a couple of cases, innocents were shot for no real reason. It’s true the other citizens might hurt the Japanese, but then the government should apply a law and law enforcement, not put the Japanese in an internment camp.
    I think the government was just making an excuse to put the Japanese into internment camps. The government received two different reports saying the Japanese were loyal to America, not Japan. In my opinion two reports saying the same thing is pretty compelling. The government still put the Japanese in the internment camps.
    Camps like this were used to imprison the soldiers took hostage during wars. Putting citizens in war camps was saying that the United States of America showed no love for certain citizens because of their ancestry.
    The government should have never made the mistake of assuming the loyalty of their citizens without proof. This is exactly what the U.S did to its own citizens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You definetley showed all the aspects of Japanese internment in a great structure!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. I agree with you that the American goverment made a terrible mistake about Japanese Americans.

      Delete
    3. You have made good points to argue your point of view, Joey. Nice comparison of the camps to the same camps that war prisoners were put into. I don't think they people were treated the same in both camps, but the comparison helps prove your point well.

      Delete
  20. In 1942 the American government did an awful thing; they interned innocent Japanese Americans and made their lives much harder. For three years, the American government held people against their will because the Americans were afraid the Japanese Americans would somehow help Japan and do something dangerous. The Japanese Americans were treated unfairly because of where they were from. It’s like judging a book by its cover - you shouldn’t judge something by the way it looks, one should find out more about it before making judgement.

    The Japanese internment started when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. I think that the bombing of Pearl Harbor was used as an excuse to create the internment camps for Japanese Americans. There had been discrimination against the Japanese for a long time and this was a way for Americans to discriminate more.

    The Japanese who were interned were from the coast, but no Japanese who were interned were from Hawaii because they were working the sugar canes. In order to prevent the Japanese from leaving the areas on the coast on their own, the government stopped them from taking money out off their bank accounts. Before the camps the Japanese were told to bring only what they could carry even though they weren’t carrying their stuff and they didn’t know what conditions they were going to be in.

    The camps were put in rural areas, so if a Japanese American escaped there would be nowhere for them to go. The camps were also put in deserts or cold areas. Before the real camps were built enough for the Japanese to move in they made the camps in small spaces such as race tracks and many of the barracks were horse stalls. When the Japanese finally got to move into the real camps they weren’t built all the way.

    The camps were not easy. In the camps it was harder for adults than children. For adults most of the jobs in the camps didn’t pay that much money, and their old businesses got destroyed. For children they got to play with their friends and there were teachers and schools.

    The internment camps were like prisons. The American government said the camps were for the Japanese’s own protection, but all the guns were pointed into camps instead of outside the camps. People were shot if they tried to escape. The camps were surrounded by barbed wire and guarded by soldiers with guns. The Japanese weren’t allowed to leave the camps until 1943 when they were allowed to leave for work, school, and to serve in the U.S. Army.

    In 1944 the Japanese internment ended, but the Japanese had trouble entering society again. When they came back their businesses were destroyed, and there was nothing in their homes because they had already sold their stuff for low prices so they didn’t have much money to buy new things.

    I think the government interned innocent people and a whole 40 years later they realized that and they wrote an apology letter and gave all the Japanese Americans who had been in the internment camps some money. I also think that an apology letter and money cannot replace almost three years of one’s life. The government even separated some families. A little bit before the internment camps when they took the Japanese leaders of some big companies and only let them go to the internment camps with their families a year to a year and a half later. The Japanese Americans were loyal to America and most of them were even born in America, but they were still interned.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you put your thinking and facts in a great mixture!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. Great job Sofia!!!

      Delete
    3. You did a great job of supporting your opinions with facts. I also like that you touched on life after the internment camps. Good job of looking at the impact outside the barbed wire, Sofia.

      Delete
  21. It was not necessary for the United States Government to put these innocent people, the Japanese-Americans, in internment camps. The government feared that the Japanese would be loyal to Japan instead of America. Japanese internment only happened to the Japanese citizens along the west coast of the United States of America. However, the internment did not happen in Hawaii, which had a large number of Japanese citizens in their territory as well. They were not put into internment camps in Hawaii due to the fact that they contributed to the economy by farming sugar cane.They were doing so well in farming that the Americans destroyed their farms; they were embarrassed. The Japanese people from Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, but the Japanese-Americans are loyal to America. The Japanese-Americans showed their loyalty by paying taxes, farming produce, they had businesses and homes, and they even agreed and trusted the government to relocate them into internment camps. Some went even as far as fighting for the United States army in the World War II.

    It was extremely unfair to take the Japanese-Americans freedom away. They had to leave their homes where they had their own bedrooms, and private bathrooms, only to not have any privacy or doors separating rooms in the camps. They were not able to speak in private, shower in private go to the bathroom in private, eat in private. They were treated very unfairly. In their homes they were able to walk down the street freely, and once they were in the internment camps they couldn’t even walk near the barbed wire fence or they would be shot by the guards. If these guards were protecting the Japanese Americans, they their guns should have been pointing outside the fence.

    In Number The Stars there was a call for human decency around the world. If we all started to one by one be kind to another, and cause a ripple effect, then human decency may be possible. If human decency was applied during the time of the war, then maybe the Americans wouldn’t judge and discriminate against the Japanese-Americans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. nice job cassius this is good

      Delete
    2. great job cassius, great Human Decency paragraph!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. Your topic sentence is very powerful Cassius!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    4. Good details Cassius. I like the ending paragraph that wraps up the piece with human decency. You did well to weave Number the Stars, human decency and Japanese Internment together to end your blog. Good way to end it!

      Delete
  22. The Japanese Internment
    I think the Japanese internment camps were unfair, harsh, and cruel.The government moved approximately 120,000 Japanese to these camps.The internment camps were built off of jealousy and fear. This prison-like place that was “ for the Japanese’ own good” was not fair to the people who did nothing. These prisons were built to break the Japanese-Americans down to make them miserable.
    I could understand if the government interned the people who bombed Pearl Harbor. Fear was the main reason for the camps.The Americans were also fearful the Japanese would turn on the Americans and bomb them too.
    These Internment camps were harsh and the Japanese had absolutely no privacy to themselves whatsoever.The only thing protecting them from seeing each other was a shower curtain as a wall. The government didn't care if men, women or children were interned, they just wanted Japanese out.
    Japanese-Americans had no plumbing so they had to use latrines as bathrooms, so there was a bunch of bathroom holes in the ground. Also they had no running water so it might’ve been harder to stay hydrated.
    This kind of behavior is the exact thing that leads to the opposite of human decency. In our recent book “Number the Stars” was a call for human decency. In World War 2 the Nazis took over Denmark and that was not treating everyone fairly equally.
    This must’ve been very hard for the Japanese to be first kicked out of society and called enemy aliens even though they were loyal to America. When the Japanese re-entered society some Americans wanted Japanese out for good.This thankfully did not happen and I hope never will happen ever.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The American government put the Japanese in the internment camps for a harsh four years. They were ripped away from their lives, which was very wrong.I think the Japanese internment camps were wrong because all the Japanese there were loyal and would go to war for America. Some of the Japanese were even citizens of America.

      If one of your own citizens say they have a war plan on America or not, believe them. When the government puts the Japanese into the internment camp and two thirds of them are their own citizens. If someone puts one thousand and more of one culture, and just give them an apology and a twenty thousand dollar check, that isn't enough.

      Even though America put them in the internment camp, they did it for their own safety. They didn't know that the Japanese in America were planning on attacking America. They could have destroyed America and we wouldn't be here, but they didn't take the risk. Well I hope this never happens again.

      Delete
    2. You have some strong ideas Amiyah! Your ending has strong ideas in it. I also like the reference you made to human decency.

      Delete
    3. Your first paragraph is strong, Westyn, and does a good job of expressing your opinion. Good way to open the blog.

      Delete
  23. The Internment of the Japanese

    I am feeling reluctant to report to you about the latest news I have learned about the internment of the Japanese given the horrible treatment the Japanese people suffered in American history.

    I strongly feel the internment of the Japanese in America was wrong. I will outline my reasons why this chapter of history was wrong below.

    On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii and declared war on the United States. As a result of this attack the President signed an Executive Order 9066 that resulted in approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans being placed in internment camps. These internment camps were like prisons.

    A lot of Americans were angry about the bombing and tried to blame all of the Japanese for the attack at Pearl Harbor. The Americans tried to say that the Japanese knew that Pearl Harbor was about to be attacked and had helped the Japanese military. The FBI knew that the rumors the Americans were saying about the Japanese were false. Other people knew as well, but did not say anything.

    Japanese Americans had a strong feeling the Americans were upset with them. They felt Americans were angry with them because reports in California over a month had all kinds of negative stuff about Japanese in the news. Even some business people put up signs in their shops saying “Free shaves for Japs” and “not responsible for mistakes” and another sign in a funeral home saying “I would rather do business with a Jap than a American” since this would mean a Japanese person had died.

    ReplyDelete
  24. The internment begun in February 1942 under Executive Order 9066 signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt . This Executive Order gave America the option to throw all of the Japanese Americans on the West Coast into internment camps. In the order the government did not use the words “Japanese Americans” the government used the words “Alien” and “non-Alien”. In order to stop the Japanese Americans from leaving the Country the government stopped many of them from taking money out of their bank accounts. This made it difficult for the Japanese to move. In addition, the Japanese were only given 48 hours to prepare for going to the internment camps. In addition, they were only allowed to carry one bag, and could not bring any radios or cameras.

    The quality of life in the camps was terrible. The Japanese were treated like inmates. The camps were surrounded by barbed wire and guarded by soldiers who waited in watchtowers holding guns. There were even reports of people being shot and killed by soldiers. One example, was James Wakasa who stepped outside of the barbed wire and the guards thought he was trying to escape, so they shot and killed him. The camps were in deserts and were uncomfortable for the Japanese because they were not used to the climate. The camps were located in the desert which guaranteed if someone escaped they would have nowhere to go.

    Camps were located in California, Arizona, Idaho, and Arkansas. One famous camp was Manzanar, which was in California. The people who were sent to this camp were mostly from Los Angeles and San Francisco. Prior to going to a camp people were contained in small spaces. These small places included race tracks. The trip from the beginning to the end was a horrible experience for the Japanese Americans.

    The government began to let some Japanese out of the camps early in 1943 to go to work or school. Under the release they would not let them back into the West Coast area of America. When the people left the camps they were given $25 and a bus ticket home. While the internment officially ended in 1944 it would take the US government more than 40 years to apologize to the Japanese Americans for putting them in internment camps. Finally in 1988, the government said they were sorry. They also gave money and sent a apology letter to the Japanese Americans who had been sent to the camps. However, a lot of the Japanese Americans only cared about the apology letter they received and not the money.

    The internment of the Japanese was wrong. Americans and people do not deserve to be treated the way Japanese Americans suffered during the time they spent at the camps. Since the Japanese lived in the United States they were Americans too and many had been born in the United States. The US is the land of the free and these acts did not follow that slogan. While the bombing of Pearl Harbor was a really bad thing I don’t feel we should have treated Japanese Americans the way they were treated. Fortunately the US learns from their flaws and we haven’t made that mistake again.
    -Kash

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great job Kash!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. You have some great research in here, Kash. I think you found the name of the person that Mr. Kurihara's death was based upon. You have definitely written a piece that will teach a reader about internment.

      Delete
  25. It was so unfair to put innocent Japanese Americans in internment camps when they did nothing to the United States. Japanese Americans were basically put in prison for just looking like the “enemy”, the people from Japan. Loyal Japanese American citizens living on the West Coast of the United States were sent to internment camps for something that Japan did to Hawaii, the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

    The bombing of Pearl Harbor took place on December 7, 1941. Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The bombing created panic and many people failed to distinguish between the Japanese of Japan and the Japanese Americans from the United States. The military pressured President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue order 9066 that lead to Japanese Americans being removed from the West Coast. General Dewitt in the United States Army thought that the Japanese Americans would join forces with the people of Japan in war. Even though all the surveys they took said that the Japanese Americans were not a threat.

    I’m one of several students in my class that feel that the Japanese Internment camps were a terrible thing to happen in history. There were approximately 120, 000 Japanese Americans that were living on the West Coast. They had regular lives with jobs, schools, houses and farmlands. They were contributing citizens of the United States. These loyal citizens were taking from the life they knew into an unknown place away from towns and cities to Internment Camps. I couldn’t imagine having to leave this wonderful place I know and going somewhere unknown for an unknown amount of time and only being able to bring what I can carry. It had to be really hard for families to leave their possessions, friends and neighbors behind. The camps were awful, they were like prisons. The camp had barbed wire all around with guards towers in each corner of the camp. There were guards on the towers pointing guns at the people in the camp. The initial living quarters were horse stalls until barracks could be finished. The Japanese Americans were only allowed to pack what they were able to carry. There was a very limited amount of space and provisions. The conditions were horrible. They had no privacy, there was only a few bathrooms for thousands of people and the plumbing was bad and rarely had hot water or water at all. The food was the same day after day after day.

    When the Japanese Americans got out of the camp they thought people will treat them the same as before the war but they were wrong. They were being discriminated against because of their race, which is not right because no matter their race people should have equal rights and be treated as the same. It was harder to find a house when no one wanted to sell land to them. People would still look at them as enemies even though they weren’t. Many years passed and some of the internees started talking about their experiences in the internment camps. The government realize that putting the Japanese Americans in the camps were wrong and they issued an apology letter along with a check and gave it to all the living Japanese Americans. I don’t think it made everything better because they couldn’t get the life they had back but at least the government tried and said sorry with the letter.

    Japanese internment left an awful mark on the “United” States. Just think, people were being taken from the life they knew just because of what they looked like. This makes me wonder if this kind of stuff can happen again. Just thinking about how those people had to experience being taken from their homes and forced to go somewhere unknown is sort of scary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great job Ravyn I can tell you have thought a lot about this and you made it clear in your writing. I hope it never happenns again too. I like your last paragraph.scary

      Delete
    2. I agree with you that it was unfair to put innocent Japanese Americans in internment camps. Great job Ravyn!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    3. This is a great piece on Japanese Internment, Ravyn. You have done well to wrap your facts in with opinion, and the ideas flow smoothly. It is easy for a reader to follow the ideas you have expressed. Well done~

      Delete
  26. I think putting Japanese Americans in internment camps was unfair. When Japanese were put in camps, it was unfair to them because almost all of them didn’t do anything wrong. The people on the West Coast were innocent and loyal to America. It is like most Japanese Americans are getting a punishment for no reason at all. The Japanese Americans did not bomb Pearl Harbor, so they did not need to be punished and put into camps. Japanese internment was unjust and unfair.

    I think getting ready for being in the camps was hard for the Japanese Americans. When the Japanese Americans were packing to go to the internment camps, it must have been hard to think about what to pack, since they could take so little. The government said that Japanese Americans could only bring what they could carry. There were no pets allowed in the internment camps. It would be really hard for me to say goodbye to my pet until I get back from being in the internment camps, if it even could survive. It would also be hard for a Japanese American to say goodbye to friends she has been with for a long time. I know it would be hard for me.

    I think that the Americans were just scared when they forced Japanese Americans into camps. War should be fought between the armies and not involve innocent people. They didn’t have to put Japanese Americans in internment camps to begin with. I don’t think that Franklin D. Roosevelt should have signed Executive order 9066 which let the American government put Japanese Americans in internment camps.

    I think life at the internment camps must have been boring. I think it was boring because they didn’t have many things to do. I can’t imagine doing boring things for one to four years. I also think it was boring because Japanese Americans could only take what they could carry, and there couldn’t be a lot of things in that suitcase, so they didn’t have a lot of things to do in the camps except to think about what was done wrong to them.

    I think it is easy to judge the past. It is easy to judge the past because I can just say the American government should not have interned the Japanese Americans. I can’t just say that because I need to think about what I would do back then about the Japanese Americans. I need to put myself in the Americans’ shoes and think to myself, would I put Japanese Americans in internment camps? Maybe I would have thought that it was right to intern Japanese Americans, but now I don’t. Now I think it was very wrong to put Japanese Americans in internment camps. Japanese internment was very wrong, unfair, and unjust.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like how you expressed both opinions for the Japanese!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. Great structure and organization of ideas, Nari! Your thoughts are very easy to follow and you educate your reader about internment. Even though they couldn't take things to do, they found their own entertainments. I wonder how boring it actually was. Great ending in that you thought about the Americans' perspective at that time.

      Delete
  27. I think that the Japanese Internment Camps brought superb and abhorrent things to both America and Japan. Some people think that the camps were the worst thing of all time, but I think that they taught both countries a lesson. America had been trying to get rid of Japan for a long time; the attack of Pearl Harbor was just the excuse to get rid of them. Japan learned not to fight with with America, and America learned not to stoop to evil’s “level”. The “level” is the way someone treats someone else. When America was frightened, they created a terrible act of fear; this was against Japan, who also attacked in an act of fear from war. Both countries did the “wrong right thing”. No country won or lost because, in the end, they both killed tens of thousands of people. America dropped an “atomic” bomb on Japan, and Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

    As an American, I am disappointed in my government. If I were Japanese, I would be mad at my government. Both countries thought that the other country “started it” when the whole darn war was an enormous misunderstanding. America disliked Japan so they thought of planning an attack. Japan heard about this and attacked first. The main thing to think about is that America only interned 118-120,000 people because they look the same as the few that attacked the Harbor. To some people, I might look Japanese, but I’m American. The good thing that came out of this is that on September 11, 2001, two planes crashed into the Twin Towers purposefully by Muslims, and without the Japanese camps, America would have interned all Muslims as well.

    All I can say is that the camps that insulted, ruined, broke, and scared the Japanese, turned out to help history a lot. The camps made us think, process the thinking, and then do our actions based off of the knowledge we found. Just because something is bad, doesn’t mean it’s not good.




    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like your topic sentence Etai!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. Interesting perspective, Etai, as you have examined the issue and found something good to have come from it. It is truly horrible when we make mistakes in our country's history, but if we don't learn from the errors, then we make them again. You have pointed out that, as long as we learn, we can avoid the errors of our past.

      Delete
  28. Japanese people who were citizens of the United States had their freedom taken away, and they were put behind barbed wire where they were broken down emotionally and mentally. On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii and declared war on the United States. A lot of Americans blamed all Japanese and felt that Japanese Americans people were bad. Even though the Japanese Americans said they were loyal to the United States, the United States government made internment camps for the Japanese. The Japanese were only rounded up on the West Coast because the United States was afraid the Japanese would bomb the West Coast next. Back then people didn’t think that Japanese were loyal to the United States government. I am writing both opinions: I agree and I disagree with putting Japanese in internment camps.
    I might agree with putting Japanese Americans in internment camps, and these are my reasons. I might agree with putting them in camps because if I were an American living back then, I would think that the Japanese are dangerous. The United States government put the Japanese people who were living in the west coast in internment camps because since some Japanese were bombing Pearl Harbor; the Americans suspected all Japanese, including Japanese citizens of the U.S. The United States government put Japanese in camps because they thought the Japanese were spies. Since America was already supporting the war in Europe, and Japan was strong, the government was fearful of the Japanese. So the United States put them in camps.
    However, I also very much disagree with putting Japanese in internment camps. I disagree because most of the Japanese Americans didn’t do anything wrong; it was only the Japanese military who bombed Pearl Harbor. The Japanese living on the West Coast were innocent, and they are being put into internment camps, which are like jails or prisons.
    If I were a Japanese American and I got a letter that said I need to leave in ten days to go to the internment camps, I would be scared to pack. The F.B.I. would arrive at Japanese people’s homes saying that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 and that the Japanese would need to leave.
    The Japanese could have and might have thought that since the Americans were only rounding up Japanese people on the West Coast, that they might be able to move to a different place. However, the Americans would not let the Japanese go into their own bank accounts, so they couldn’t use their money to move to another place. And even in other cities, there was an anti-Japanese feeling. Some signs said “Free shaves for Japs” and “not responsible for accidents.” A funeral home had a sign saying “I’d rather do business with a Jap than an American.”
    In the internment camps, there were no stalls to separate the showers and the toilets. The water didn’t come out well in some places. The United States government was trying to break the Japanese down in case they were spies for the Japanese government.
    In conclusion, we can say that putting Japanese Americans in camps was wrong, but at the time when that was happening, saying it was wrong or right was hard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great job Jinjoo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You have great details

      Delete
    2. Your text does well to prove your points, Jinjoo. I like that you examined different perspectives and can see that there were two sides to the issue. It's hard to understand the thinking that was in the country 77 years ago, but you were able to show what you think the thoughts were. Nicely done-

      Delete
  29. Japanese Internment
    I feel that the Japanese internment camps were stupid, idiotic, and purely driven by unnecessary fear that the Japanese would attack. The only reason why the Japanese got interned was because people such as General Dewitt made a false assumption and did not want “Enemy Aliens” in their areas. General Dewitt said that these camps were for the safety of all the internees. There were many things that the government said “made these camps better”. Examples are, one; these camps were “for” the internees safety even though in the guard towers the guns were pointed inward, but if they were for the protection of internees they would be pointed outwards.

    A few Haikus about the Japanese Internment Camps

    Haiku One
    Despicable US
    Unfair, unjust, hate, shame
    What did they do wrong?

    Haiku Two
    Barbed wire, Japanese
    Internment, concentration
    Shame, America

    Haiku Three
    43 years, $20,000
    Life can never be given back
    $20,000 isn’t enough

    I read an article about a study that was done on the internment and concentration camps in World War II that concluded that the internment camps should have been called concentration camps and the concentration camps run by the Nazis should have been called death camps. This article just proves to me that the government lied about many things to make it like they did not do such horrible things to people that were loyal to the U.S if not U.S citizens.

    There are many things that were horrible in the internment camps that the U.S government created, here is an example. The bathrooms in these camps were intended to take the dignity out of the internees, the bathroom stalls had no walls and everybody that was in the room could see you; some women even put paper bags on their heads.

    Overall the camps were horrible and should have never been done; in my opinion the only semi-good things that the U.S did was not take away children from their families and giving them schools, hospitals and other things like that. However this act was wrong and against our country’s national anthem because, the last line is “land of the free and home of the brave” but in World War II the Japanese-Americans in the U.S were not free but they were brave.






    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great job Elanor, I like your haikus!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. Your use of the Haiku raised the level of creativity, and they supply strong thoughts about internment. That is a great idea! Your thoughts are well constructed and your point of view comes out strong, Elanor. Good work!

      Delete
  30. During a huge war, Japanese Americans were thrown into filthy internment camps. Japan was at war with America and Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. President Roosevelt said that he was concerned that the Japanese Americans would rise up to take over America, or that Americans would kill the Japanese Americans because they looked like America’s enemy. President Roosevelt sent out a survey to see if the Japanese Americans were loyal to America or Japan. The Japanese Americans were loyal to America.

    General Dewitt acted unfairly to the Japanese Americans. Most of them were American citizens and even the people who were not citizens were loyal to America. General Dewitt insisted that even the loyal citizens on the west coast had to be interned. He soon passed order 9066, which said that people living on the west coast could be removed. Instead of Japanese Americans, this order said enemy aliens.

    The Japanese Americans could not take a lot of stuff. The Japanese Americans could only take what they could carry. Most electronic devices were contraband. The items they couldn’t take were sold at unfairly low prices because other people knew that the Japanese Americans couldn’t take large items. They couldn’t even take their car.

    The American government hastily put Japanese Americans into unfinished internment camps. The internment camps lacked important things like plumbing. The disgusting bathrooms had no privacy. Some internment camps did not even have walls in the cramped and tiny barracks that the Japanese Americans were put in by their government. They small rooms had no insulation. Some Japanese Americans faced terrible desert heat while others lived in shocking cold. The water ran out sometimes. The beds were just army cots with a straw mattress on top.

    Japanese Americans were shot in the internment camps. The guards occasionally thought a Japanese American was trying to escape, but they were unused to the climate and they didn’t know the area. All the Japanese Americans knew there was no escape.

    Many Japanese Americans should have been protected by the Constitution. All citizens of America have rights. The Japanese Americans’ rights were stripped away. America’s national Anthem boasts about freedom, but not all the citizens were free. The American government indecently broke their own laws. Two searches found it unnecessary to intern American citizen
    After four long awful years, the Japanese Americans were free to go home. The war ended, but many people still hated Japanese Americans. They were beaten and shot, even though they had no control on their ancestry.

    The true cause for internment was long before the war. In the gold rush, miners discriminated Chinese miners. The Chinese did not get good jobs. Many ended up harvesting crops for little money and paying an unfair and heavy tax. The Chinese miners eventually left. All the white miners had better jobs, so no one was left to harvest. America decided to let Japanese in, so they could do low paying jobs, be taxed, and be hated. The Americans made sure that the Japanese Americans could not be successful. When the war came, the American government saw their chance to remove Japanese Americans from society.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can tell that you put a lot of thought into this blog Carrie. Great job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Delete
    2. You have a well-structured piece, Carrie, and the ideas you supplied are easy to follow. There is a lot of information in here to teach a reader about internment. Great factual piece of writing.

      Delete
  31. Japanese Internment was a very long time ago, but things like that still happen, so I will say my opinion on the Internment camps and what the government did.
    The internment camps are not a good, they show so much disrespect. But the people at the internment camps(such as the guards) are trying to show that what they are doing is the right thing to do. They have said that the guards are there to protect the Japanese Americans, but then why would they point their guns inside the camp rather than outside? The Japanese Americans did nothing to harm anyone in the United States! Two reports came back with the same result, the Japanese Americans were loyal! Plus, there were the surveys they took that also prove they are loyal and would not attack the Americans! Most public bathrooms, like in a school, are not pleasant, but the internment camp bathroom have no walls and the toilets and showers are directly next to each other. As a matter of fact, the Japanese Americans still worked hard for the United states despite all this. There is more than I can say about how horrible the internment camps are, but the really amazing thing is how the Japanese Americans still worked so hard for what they were loyal to.
    The government has done many bad things in the past, the time of the internment camps was one of those times. The pledge of allegiance was “adopted” by the government and was and still is a big thing in the people’s lives. So why do they not listen to it? The pledge of allegiance says “...and justice for all” but there was definitely not justice for all of people, including the the Japanese Americans. The pledge says a lot of things like that, but even today a lack of people listen. What the government did caused horrible things including having an undertaker put a sign saying “I would rather do business with a Jap than an American.” and numerous other signs, and things being spoken out loud. A few years later the war ends, however that is not the end of it, of course. forty-three years later the government decides it’s a good idea to finally apologize. People have died because of the government, people have had to give birth in such a horrible place! They did not apologize sooner because they were writing and being thoughtful, they just did not want to apologize! Eventually they sent all the previous internees an apology letter and 20,000 dollars. One may think 20,000 dollars is a lot, but infinity is not enough. People died in internment, in such a horrible place. People lost their loved ones, the government took a chunk of their life out and made it horrible. No one can pay that back with money. So of course, the Japanese Americans only wanted the apology letter.
    The Japanese Americans have suffered so much from the interment and government, but in the end all they wanted was an apology.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with Nari-your final sentence sums up the redress very well. It makes people think about the things they say and do to one another. In the end, they want to have an apology and for people to take responsibility for their actions. Good ending, Selena!

      Delete
  32. Your last sentence is very powerful Selena. Great job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete