Monday, February 22, 2016

Japanese Internment During World War II





As always, write clear ideas, use good spelling and strong conventions and create a piece of writing that will fully interest your reader. Of course, let's comment on each other's work!



193 comments:

  1. The biggest impact for the people who were interned was moving. The Japanese American people who could not carry items like a house had to be sold. But, some of the friends of these people had space to keep some of the Japanese family's items, so the family could get the items back from the kind friend. Also, when these people moved to a place like Topaz, they were not ready for that type of weather. After the people realized the Japanese Americans were freed, some had no where to live! Some of these people only had what they could carry.

    Also, the Japanese Americans were used to have privet homes! But, the horse stalls didn't go all the way to the cealing. So, the horse stalls were not at all private. Children were having to leave their educations to move to the camps like college students. Adults were leaving jobs so they had to shut down companies.

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    1. Good ideas, Zoey!

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    2. Good idea, Zoey. Look at how many times they had to pack up and move, too. Hard time for them-

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    3. Yeah, great details.

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    4. Your blog is unique.

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  2. I think that the biggest impact on the people interned in the Japanese Internment Camps was actually having the memories of being in the camps. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt passed a law to intern all the Japanese on the West Coast. The people could only take what they could carry. They had to sell or give to friends everything they could not take with them. The people could not live their lives the same way for the next three and a half years. Family pets could not be taken into the internment camps with their owners. Some of the dogs were so used to their owners that they wouldn`t eat with the people who adopted them. Some of them died so when their original owners were released they could not get their pets back and live with them. So that part of their every day lives was taken. When they had to leave the homes had to be sold, taken by friends or just left behind. When they were released there was usually no where to live. People who were involved in major Japanese owned businesses in America were taken in by the F.B.I. away from their families. After a few days the day came that everyone had to leave their old lives behind and live in the camps. The camps were usually in dry, desert-like, unpopulated areas. These people were used to living in houses but now they are living in horse stall sized homes. They were only served small portions of food each meal. The dining hall was not open for snacks in between in each meal. They were only allowed 39 cents a day to buy what they wanted to. The beds were hard, old army cots. They were used to mattresses but now the beds were hard. Sometimes the walls did not always reach the ceiling so sometimes people could hear other conversations. In the bathrooms there were no stalls separating the showers and toilets. That is why the biggest impact on Japanese was having the memories of being in the camps.

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    1. I like how many details you have!

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    2. Good job describing the camps, Alexis

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  3. Wow, Alexis that piece of writing is very long!

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    1. Great jog Alexis! You really know your dates.

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    2. This is excellent, Alexis! You touched on so many parts of the Internment Camp experience, and you have definitely informed anyone who reads your post about Japanese Internment during World War II.

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    3. Your blog is long and percise.

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    4. Thank you everybody for saying such nice things about my blog! :)

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  4. THE IMPACT OF THE INTERNMENT CAMPS
    The biggest impact on the Japanese from being relocated to the internment camps was the sense of betrayal that their country locked them up even though they were faithful American citizens. Although the FBI said they were not a threat, the American government still sent the Japanese to internment camps. This was very difficult for the Japanese because even though some of the Japanese were risking their life for America in the military, they were still betrayed by the United States government and were forced to give up their homes and live in barren conditions in the barracks. They had to survive all kinds of harsh weather, and they were separated from the rest of the world. Then, to make matters even worse, when they tried to go back to their homes, many people didn’t want them back.


    PACKING FOR THE INTERNMENT CAMPS
    In order to go to the internment camps, the Japanese had to leave behind their pets (which sometimes died of sadness because their owners left,) and the children had to leave behind their toys because they could only take what they could carry. They also had to sell their houses and get very little money on all of the items that they sold. The Japanese Americans were forced to sell everything very quickly, and people would only buy items for very low prices. In return for selling most of their things, they had to live with no personal privacy in the camps and they had a very small barrack (the people in Tanforan had to live in horse stalls.)

    INSIDE THE INTERNMENT CAMPS
    In the internment camps, there was very little privacy. The latrines (bathrooms) had no doors, nor did the showers. People wore paper bags over their heads so no one would recognize them in the bathroom. Also, in some camps there weren’t very good hospitals, so if people got sick they did not have adequate medical care. People in Topaz had to put up with terrible dust storms and all of the camps were in isolated areas.
    AFTER THE INTERNMENT CAMPS
    Finally, after about forty years, the Japanese who went to the internment camps got a letter of apology from the government and a check for $20,000. Even though the check was not worth four years of the Japanese people’s lives, it was still the right thing for the government to do to apologize for the way the Japanese Americans were treated.
    CONCLUSION
    The Japanese internment camps were a dark spot in America’s history. It resulted in a lot of misery and nothing good came of it.

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    1. I agree Josh it was terrible.

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    2. Very well covered, Josh! You did a great job of discussing the impact on the Japanese Americans on multiple aspects of their experience. This writing teaches a great deal of information to a reader. I hope lots of people read it!

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    3. Thank you for the nice comments Mr. La Marr and Justin!

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    4. Awesome blog Josh! I agree that money is never worth time. I can't imagine being taken away from my life for 4 years!

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    5. Thank you Emelia!

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    6. I really like your thinking and reason Josh.

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    7. Good job with the impacts!

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    8. However,I disagree that nothing good came of the camps. I think a good thing was that the United States learned a good lesson about interning innocent people. Otherwise, you have a long blog and very detailed information.

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    9. I can totally see that John. and they did learn never to do that again, and payed the Japanese $20,000 in return of 4 years in camp.

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    10. Yes, but the Internment camps were still bad.

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  5. The biggest impact I think, was living in the interment camps. I think that because Japanese-Americans didn’t have proper or unfinished homes. There was also not a lot of privacy around there. They didn’t bring a lot of things to the interment camps because the governor said to only bring things they could carry. When the Japanese-Americans moved in the interment camps, they didn’t have a lot of space. They had only cobs, and a fire place. There was only one room in the barracks with about 1-4 Japanese- Americans in there. The food there was very little. They didn’t have milk or meat in the mess hall. They usually have bread or potato for the day with a little more food. In the interment camps, there were huge dust storms back then. The dust go in the Japanese-Americans eyes, mouth, and nose. If the Japanese-Americans took jobs in the interment camps, they would get paid $12-$19 a month! There is also watch towers to look out for any Japanese-Americans trying to escape. If they see someone too close to the bar wires, the soldiers would give out a warning. Though, if the Japanese-Americans can’t hear the soldiers, then the soldiers immediately shoot the Japanese-Americans. That is why I think living in the interment camps is the biggest impact.

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    1. I agree Naomi you successfully convinced me.

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    2. Me too. Good job talking about living in the internment camps!

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  6. Good summary, Naomi. Is there any part that you think has a stronger impact, or is it all equal?

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    1. You have a strong conclusion.

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  7. HOW THE JAPANESE CAMPS STARTED
    The biggest impact of the Japanese Internment camps was the memories of the camps. When the bombing of Pearl Harbor happened on December 7, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt signed a paper that said America could intern all the Japanese on the West Coast. Before the Japanese knew it, they were going to Tan Fran. Many Japanese had bad memories of the internment camps, like when Yuki had the nightmare about the dust storm in Topaz. I don’t think the starting of internment was right.


    CONDITIONS OF INTERNMENT CAMPS
    The conditions of the Japanese internment were poor. The barracks were incomplete, the food was poor, the latrines had no doors and you had to shower with a group. Ladies would put bags and boxes over their heads for privacy. The living arrangements in the internment camps were disgraceful.

    COMING HOME FROM THE INTERMENT CAMPS
    The hardest thing for the Japanese Americans going into the Internment Camp was leaving their home, the possessions they couldn’t carry, and their pets. I think this was the most difficult part for the Japanese Americans due to the fact they were losing their memories. Sometimes they had to sell their house for very little money. When they came home from the camps a lot of the Japanese homes were poorly kept and some caretakers wouldn’t give the homes back! The valuable possessions they couldn’t take were missing or stolen. Most of their pets died from grieving for their owners, like Pepper in Journey to Topaz. After about 40 years the Japanese received 20,000 dollars as a payment for their imprisonment. I don’t think 20,000 dollars is enough money for four years of my life. I believe it was extremely wrong to put the Japanese in internment camps.



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    1. Nice job, Christian. You have brought out many good points here. Not all internees went to Tanforan. It depended on where they lived as to which Assembly Center they went to. Yuki and her family went there because they lived in Berkeley. I agree with you about the fact that $20,000 does not come close to repayment for 4 years of lost time in society.

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    2. Thank you Mr. La Marr

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    3. Great job Christian. I like how you used percise words.

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    4. You have lots of detailed information, Christian.

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  8. Try this page

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Map_of_World_War_II_Japanese_American_internment_camps.png

    and this page

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_Japanese_Americans

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    1. 2 pages to go to. this will be intresting!

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    2. I used the Wikipedia link for extra information tidbits. Thank you Riley!

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    1. I like that you posted pages.

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  10. I think the biggest impact of World War Two for the Japanese on the west coast of the United States of America was that most of the Japanese were getting interned and getting sent out. Sixty-two percent of the Japanese were American citizens so they were getting interned by their own country. Sometimes the Japanese American’s Caucasian friends kept some of the items those Japanese American friends owned. They would be called "Japs" (for Japanese) to be rood sense the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. The Japanese Americans had ten days to pack. They could only take what they could carry. All the Japanese Americans had to have a tag for which ”apartment” they were in. The first place the Japanese Americans has to go to was horse stalls. The horse stalls were 10 by 20 feet. Then the Japanese had to go to internment camps. Getting home was very tough. The Japanese Americans probably sold most of the item they owned even shops. How were the Japanese Americans supposed to live? The Americans sort of made them lose mostly everything the Japanese Americans owned. That is why I think going and coming back from the internment camps was the hardest part for the Japanese Americans in World War Two.

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    1. Good post Riley. I like the statistic that you found and the recognition that the Japanese Americans were being interned by their own country.

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    2. The amount of details in your post is awesome!

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    3. They speak the truth! Good work, Riley1

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    4. my blog was loosing everything they owned, but I can totally see what you're saying.

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  11. In the beginning of World War II the United States was not part of the war, but after the bombing of Pearl Harbor everything changed. The United States government was scared that the Japanese would create more harm to them and after a while decided to intern people of Japanese descent in order to protect the American citizens. Interestingly, the Japanese Americans were told that they were in the camps for their protection. Even those who were citizens were put in the camps! Prisoners were given one to two weeks to pack their belongings. Many of the Japanese Americans were very successful and hardworking people and when they got put in the camps I think they were heartbroken. The barracks for four people were as small as a little bedroom, the latrines did not have doors, and the food was all canned. However, what I really admire about the Japanese is that in the internment camps they were very resilient and were very innovative. Men made furniture out of food crates and women made their own scissors, created paper flowers, and were able to do flower organization just like they did back at home. These camps lasted for four years until the war was over and the prisoners were let out.

    I think that the biggest impact on those in internment camps was the thought that they were not considered loyal to their country and that they were "enemy-aliens." Many Japanese came to America because they thought that they would have better opportunities and they would not be judged by their looks but by their acts. Except, instead of that happening, the exact opposite happened. If the government interned those of Japanese descent, it also should have interned those of German and Italian descent because they were also from enemy countries. However, German Americans and Italian Americans were not interned. In the camps, the prisoners tried their best to prove that they were ardent Americans. For example, when the United States government needed more fighters for the war they asked young men in the internment camps and many men joined to prove themselves worthy. These young men were sent to the most dangerous parts in the war but they were very successful and made a huge contribution to the Allies in World War II. Although most people had contempt towards the Japanese Americans some people felt bad for them and helped. Some people would buy the property of the interned prisoner when they were gone and when the war was over gave the property back.

    After the war was over, many rumors had been sent out about how "awful" the Japanese were. In fact, most times Japanese Americans went back to their old neighborhoods they suffered more discrimination. For example, people put up signs that said "Japs keep moving, this is a white man's neighborhood." However, this did not stop the Japanese Americans from keeping their persistence. After a while, people started realizing that what they did was wrong. Finally, in 1988 President Ronald Reagan sent redress to the internment camp survivors. Now, four generations later, some of the most successful people are Japanese because they worked hard to achieve their dreams.

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    1. Excellent work, Emelia! You have some outstanding vocabulary in this post. I agree with you that a very important impact on the Japanese Americans is that they were considered enemy aliens of the country that they called home.

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    2. Wow! Emelia, great job on your post! I agree that the Japanese were very resilient and innovative. I have admiration for these people as well.

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    3. This blog post was very good Emelia, The internment camps were harsh.

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    4. Emelia!I like your wording. Your blog is long, but flows together nicely. this blog is important because it has good and true information.

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    5. Thanks for commenting on my blog Emelia! I like what you said.

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    6. I agree your vocabulary is very good and it flows together great.

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    7. Great job Emelia your post is so long and interesting. I liked so much and I wish there was more!

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    8. Good explanation of what happened after the camps!

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  12. Japanese were very mistreated during World War II and afterwards as well.

    The Japanese Internment Camps took away from Japanese kids’ education.
    A child could be taken to a camp at any age. If a seven-year-old boy was taken he would get released most likely at the age of a fourth grader, but he would have a first grade education once the war ended. Most children I know spend a lot of their time on school and work around the house. Little boys and girls got very bored with nothing to do. Everybody could only bring one suitcase that was normally filled with essentials not things to play with and enjoy.

    Part of the Japanese way of life was taken away from them.
    Privacy was a big part of Japanese culture. In the internment camps there was no privacy. The latrines had no walls to separate stalls, the showers had no curtains, and the walls weren’t complete. People could hear each other through walls. Other people called the Japanese Japs as a mean name.

    Overall I think the Japanese Internment Camps were rude and cruel to Japanese people.

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    1. Amazing blog Ana! I agree that one wrong decision can change thousands of people's lives, forever.

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    2. I like your conclusion Ana.

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    3. I agree that a big part of their lives were taken away from them

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    4. Great job looking at the Multiple Perspectives, Ana!

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  13. Good ideas, Ana. I like that you mentioned the impact of internment on the education of the Japanese. How hard that must have been for them. That is why the Japanese in the camps made sure that schools were open. However, that didn't help the college-aged students.

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  14. The Japanese Americans were put in internment camps because it was feared by the government that they would be loyal to Japan, and might overthrow the U.S. government. People did not know how big of an impact this would create. I think that the biggest impact of the internment camps during World War II, was that the Japanese Americans did not have any home to come back to when they were released. In order to go to the internment camps the Japanese Americans had to either sell their houses, or a neighbor would have to take care of their houses. There were few neighbors willing to help in this way. Most of the time, the Japanese Americans moved to apartments. The Japanese Americans lost money because they were not able to sell their houses much money, they lost memories that their house held, and they lost opportunities to pass down to their children what they had lived in for years.

    Another impact is that most of the Japanese American’s pets died. The Japanese Americans had to sell all their possessions that they could not carry to the internment camps. The pets felt so depressed because their original owners had given them away, and the pets would not eat. Most of them died. That had great impact because it was very sad for the Japanese Americans because they loved them so much.

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    1. Nice blog William! You have an excellent presentation!

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    2. You have good information.

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    3. Yes William, losing memories is pretty bad.

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    4. It was sad when the pets died. Nice, William

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    5. Why, thank you John!

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  15. Good thoughts, William. You have a great point about the Japanese internees losing all the memories that they had in their homes. That's a sad part of the experience. Good job to pick that up.

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  16. The Biggest Impact on the Japanese Internment Camps

    I think that the biggest impact on the Japanese internment camps was leaving their schools. The Japanese American kids and teens had to leave their friends, teachers,and their schools. They had to move to another schools. They would not get the same education and activities from the new schools. Also, they should worry about teaching materials and technologies at the new school. They had to make new friends and get used to with their new teachers. It was even harder for the college students. They had to wait a few years later to go back and finish their education. It would delay their lives. I couldn't imagine how hard it would be if I had to leave my friends and teachers behind. I would miss them so much. Overall, moving to a new school is a very sad thing to do.

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    1. Great blog Katie! I like how you wrote about schools and education. It's very important. It helps teach us. Again great blog

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    2. Moving schools is hard. You make a good point, Katie!

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    3. Good job summing up your ideas, Katie

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  17. I think the biggest impact of the Japanese being put in Internment Camps was leaving friends and family behind. Some Japanese were lucky and their friends took care of their pets. Even thought the Japanese missed their pets, the pets missed their owners more. Some got so depressed that they died. When the Japanese fathers were being taken away from their family they got upset and angry, but in the end they were reunited with their family. As for friends the Japanese were sad and lonely at the Internment C amps. What if you never saw your friends and pets again?

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    1. Fantastic post Zeta! I agree it was really hard leaving friends and family behind, especially when you had known them your whole life.

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    2. Good aspect to discuss, Zeta. I couldn't imagine leaving friends behind. At least Yuki got to meet a new friend who turned out to be a great companion.

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    3. Thank you Mr. La Marr. Thanks Emelia.

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    4. I really injoyed reading your blog.

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  18. I thought the biggest impact on the Japanese Americans being put in the Internment Camps was that these people had memories of being in the camps. The United Sates Government told all Japanese Americans that they had to pack in 10 days and could only pack what they could carry. The Japanese Americans put as much as they could carry in a blanket tied up with a rope. The Japanese Americans first moved to horse stalls. The horse stalls, dining halls, restrooms, and laundry rooms were all inside barbed wire, while some Americans were working on the actual Internment Camps. The Japanese were kept in a small space without privacy, the bathrooms had toilets with no doors, and they had to share showers. The women of the Japanese Americans had a solution to that: they would put a paper bag over their heads so no one knew who it was. Some people that were forced to sell their dogs received letters from the person who bought the dog. After a few months, the Japanese Americans moved again. The places were dried up sandy lakes, swamps or where no one wanted to live. For each day, they paid 39 cents for a small portion to eat. In the dried up sandy lakes, they would have dust storms. In swamps they would have spiders and insects. The people in the dried up sandy lakes and the people in the swamps would debate who had it worse. The children played marbles and other things to entertain themselves. The adults would get jobs in the Internment Camps. The Camp riots beat up the helpful Japanese Americans for what they were doing. The Japanese Americans were released January 2, 1945. After about 40 years, The United States Government wrote an apology letter to all survivors of the Internment Camps. This man was Ronald Reagan. In the letter, there was a check for $20,000 to each Japanese American of the Internment Camps. For four years they weren't in the outside world, forced out of their homes.

    CONCLUSION
    This is one of the worst discriminatory stories in History.

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    1. I agree it was one of the worst discriminatory in History.

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    2. Is there a memory that you think would be harder than any of the others? I agree with your conclusion, Lauryn. In fact, people wanted to put the race of people who made the 911 attacks in internment camps, too. Many people said that we can't because of the discrimination done during World War II. They ended up not making the same mistake again.

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    3. Nice conclusion, Lauryn.

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  19. Introduction: The Japanese internment camps had a big impact on the Japanese Americans. In World War 2, Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. The President (Franklin Roosevelt) decided that all the Japanese Americans in America had to go to internment camps until the war was over.

    Packing for the Camps: The Japanese Americans only had ten days to pack. They had to get together most of their belongings in that short amount of time. They could only bring what they could carry. People couldn’t carry their business to make money to the internment camps, so they had to get rid of their jobs. They had to find a way to get rid of all their stuff that they were not bringing in ten days, too. They sold lots of their stuff for a small price. Pets also had to be found a new home, in ten days.

    Saying Goodbye to Pets: After packing, the big thing came. Saying goodbye to pets. Not lots of people wanted pets. Most of the time, selling their pets was saying goodbye to them forever. When their pets missed their owners, they would get so depressed that they would not eat, and eventually die.

    Living in a Horse Stall: The internment camps were not ready, so the Japanese Americans had to live in horse stalls. People could hear what was going on in the other horse stalls next to them if they were in their horse stall or close to a horse stall.

    The Internment Camps: The internment camps did not have a lot of privacy, either. Not all the houses were bunched up like the horse stalls, but privacy was better at their homes. Nobody liked the internment camps much. There was not a lot of things to do. Working and eating were some of the only two things to keep the Japanese Americans busy.

    The American Government’s Sorry: In the 1990s the American Government gave a $20,000 check to all the living Japanese Americans that were in the internment camps. That was not enough. Only $20,000 for four years of their life, their pets, their jobs, their house, and most of their personal belongings? The Japanese Americans shouldn’t have even gone in the concentration camps.

    Conclusion: The internment camps had a big impact on the Japanese American lives in the 1940s.

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    1. I agree with your information.

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    2. That's a lot of good information, Rhys. Did all the Japanese have to go to Internment Camps? Out of all the impacts you discussed, which do you think would be the hardest to have?

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    3. Your blog is well written and keeps me wanting to read more. Outstanding blog, Rhys!

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    4. Probably saying goodbye to my pets and all my belongings.

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  20. I think the biggest impact of the Japanese Internment camps was how much they were excluded. The Japanese and Japanese-Americans were not only identified as enemy aliens and non-aliens but some people called them the impolite name “Japs.” They had to sell their belongings, even pets, before going to the Internment Camps. Since people were not buying their belongings, they had to sell $200 cars for $50 for people to buy them just because they had Japanese ancestry. When the Japanese came back, they didn’t want the Japanese back so, they hung up signs saying “we don’t want Japs, go away.” Another example of exclusion and hardship occurred when their grocers wouldn’t allow them buy groceries anymore at their store. As you can see the Japanese were isolated, insulted and excluded from their communities. In conclusion, the biggest impact of the Japanese Internment camps was how differently the Japanese were treated because of their ancestry.

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    1. You have a good point Sara.

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    2. It is sad that ancestry can cause such harsh treatment of other people. Your choice of the word "ancestry" at the end was a good choice, Sara.

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    3. I agree with MR. La Marr. Great post, Sara.

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  21. I think the biggest impact on the Japanese was losing all their belongings
    PACKING:
    When the president declared that the Japanese had to be moved off the coast they had ten days to pack. Most of their stuff was either sold or put into storage to keep safe. The Japanese lost more than half their belongings because they did not have enough time to pack. People had to sell furniture, pets, cars and even their house. If a Japanese person was a collector they would have to lose their whole collection of things and they would be very sad. Almost everyone was very frustrated about the packing.
    THE INTERNMENT CAMPS:
    The conditions of the internment camps were very poor. They had no privacy in the bathrooms, terrible dust storms, and dangerous animals. If a person was to wander out of the boundaries they were ordered to come back. If someone failed to obey or hear the directions, they would get shot at. Luckily, only eight people got shot at and were killed. There were ten internment camps in total.
    AFTER THE CAMPS:
    After the camps the Japanese were still hated by most people. The Americans wanted to have the Japanese away from them forever. Fortunately for the Japanese, there were some people that were nice to them. They let the Japanese borrow their houses, use tools, and even defend them. The prejudice stopped in the 1970s when the president said that the discrimination against the Japanese was not right and should be stopped.
    I think the discrimination was wrong and that the Japanese should have the same privileges as everyone else.

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    1. Sorry, I forgot to hit the enter button between the last two sentences.

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    2. Well done, Calvin. You have chosen an impact that I think affected many Japanese-Americans. I couldn't imagine trying to choose which belongings I could keep and which ones I had to let go. Hopefully, my friends would have stored them for me. However, many of the Japanese-American's friends were other Japanese. I like your conclusion sentence.

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    3. I agree discrimination was wrong.

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    4. Good structure, Calvin. Your blog is well organized and easy to read.

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  22. I think the biggest impact on the Japanese who were interned in world war two was that they were very mistreated during and after the war. I think this was the biggest impact because the Japanese were put behind barbed wire for three years during the war because they looked like the enemy. Also during the war, people in California were angry at the Japanese, and never wanted them to return to California. After the war, the Japanese were not allowed into most restaurants on the west coast. Some people tried to shoot Japanese-Americans. Some of those people succeeded.
    In conclusion, I think the biggest impact on the Japanese-Americans who were interned in world war two was that they were very mistreated during and after the war.

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    1. yes, Tommy, i agree that the Japanese were mistreated. check out mine!

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    2. I agree, Tommy. That mistreatment by their own country must have had a big impact on their lives.

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    3. I agree with your information.

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    4. Good conclusion, Tommy!

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  23. Biggest Impact
    I think the biggest impact on the Japanese that went to the internment camps is that they lost all their belongings and their house. The Japanese most commonly sell it, rented it to someone or, rarely a friend would take care of it. After the four years in camp the Japanese had a hard time coming back. Their house might have not been theirs any more. It could have been destroyed or owned by a different family. Coming back was also hard, because many people who lived around didn’t want a Japanese to live next to them.
    Why was this the biggest impact?
    The loss of their houses and belongings was the biggest impact because when the government let the Japanese out of the internment camps, after 4 years, the Japanese didn’t have stuff to live with, money to pay with, and they didn’t have a home to live in. So that basically meant they had to start their life all over again. It was also hard to make the living because most businesses wouldn’t hire Japanese.
    Why the Americans and the Japanese didn’t like each other?
    The Americans didn’t like the Japanese because they bombed Perl Harbor, December 7 1941. In return, Americans dropped two nuclear bombs in Japan. Japanese living in the United States didn’t like the Americans because they were forced to live in the internment camps and were not allowed to become United States citizens.
    About the internment camps
    The internment camps were rough and boring. The Japanese didn’t have much space, stuff or privacy. The bathrooms were not clean and did not have walls in between each toilet and shower. The women and girls wore bags over their heads so that nobody would see who it was.
    The barracks the Japanese lived in were very small. It could fit only four beds, a very small table and some more belongings. The food was only 39 cents a day! Also they could only take what they needed.
    Overall I think being a Japanese in the United States during World War two was very hard.

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    1. Good analysis of the situation, Emma. Do you think they were ever able to get replacements for all the items they lost? That would be hard.

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    2. I agree it was hard being a Japanese.

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    3. Good job, Emma! Your important historical details are great!

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  24. You all are very busy! As soon as I get one read and scored, another one comes in! Good ideas so far, 4th graders; keep it going!

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    1. Good post, Mr. LaMarr. What is your Big Idea?

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    2. My Big Idea is that the class is doing great, and I can't keep up with all the writing ! ! !

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  25. INTRODUCTION
    The Japanese Americans were abducted from their homes and told to live their lives behind barbed wire.

    IMPACT
    I think that one of the major impacts of being put in the Internment camps was being locked out of the real world. I think this because after they were put in the camps they couldn’t get back out. If they even got close to the rim of the camp (barbed wire) they would get shot. In the book JOURNEY TO T0PAZ, Mr. Kurihara was walking along the edge of the camp looking for buried arrow heads in the dirt. He was spotted by a soldier in a guard tower and shot dead.
    Another reason why this was a big impact was the Japanese Americans couldn’t pay the bills for their homes and shops because they were in the camps. All of their property was taken by others. When they came out of the camps they had no homes or businesses to make money to buy food to survive. We learned this by listening to Japanese speakers who had actually lived in the camps, while visiting the California Museum.
    The biggest impact of being locked in a camp was that your own country did that to you. The United States government treated Japanese Americans like they weren’t humans. How would that NOT impact you and your family? Even though they were put in camps and locked away, they were still loyal to their country. It’s hard for me to believe this happened and how badly the Japanese were treated.
    Internment camps had a great impact on Japanese Americans.

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    1. Great finish to your blog, Kiran. The final paragraph is strong and creates an impact on the reader. Nicely done!

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    2. Good job comparing Journey to Topaz with the real world, Kiran!

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  26. Replies
    1. I agree that the Internment Camps had great impact on the Japanese.

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  27. I think the impact of the Japanese was when they had to leave their homes. When they left their homes they took the belongings they wanted to bring and left or sold the things they didn’t want. If Japanese had pets they would give it to a American friend. They were very sad to leave their homes, but some Japanese owned stores so they had to leave them to. They had ten days to pack all the belongings they could carry. Most of these people were just regular citizens and did nothing wrong, but they were put in the Internment Camps anyways.

    Inside the camps, conditions were horrible. The Japanese lived in small horse stalls, it smelled like manure, they also did not have any privacy. In the bathrooms there were no doors so they put a paper bag over their head so they could get some privacy. They heard their neighbor’s conversations from next door.

    They worked very hard for very little pay a month. Most Americans called the Japanese ‘’ Japs,’’ which they didn’t like. They were in the Internment Camp for 4 years straight. When they got back they had to start all over.

    Later in the 1980s Ronald Reagan gave $20,000 to each Japanese and a big sorry to the Japanese people that were still alive. That was not a lot of money for 4 years taken away from their lives.

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    1. I agree that $20,000 is a small amount for the time in the Internment Camps. What would be an amount that you think would be fair? Good coverage of the big ideas about life in the Internment Camps, Blake.

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    2. I agree with your information Blake.

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    3. your blog has true and well written details Blake.

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    4. You have great proof, Blake.

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  28. INTERNMENT CAMPS

    For the Japanese the internment camps were very hard to live in. Before the Americans put the Japanese in the internment camps the people building them didn't know that there was so many people coming. So the Americans put all the Japanese into horse stalls because there was not a lot of places to put them. When the interment camps were ready the Americans put the Japanese install barracks. Life in the internment camps was very hard to live in.

    PRIVACY AT INTERNMENT CAMPS

    At the internment camps privacy is hard to have.
    Privacy is hard to have because when the Japanese were squished into barracks people across from them could hear every word they said. Every Japanese person had to share bathrooms, showers, and, laundry. At the showers and bathrooms Japanese put paper bags over their heads so they could have some privacy and no one could see who they were.

    AFTER INTERNMENT CAMPS

    After war was over the people who where still alive Ronald Reagan gave a big sorry and also gave a check for $20,000. I think that is not enough money for the Japanese because they have to live life in a desert for years. Before the Japanese came to the internment camps they had to sell most of their items even pets. When the Japanese sold their pets they missed them so much they didn’t eat and died a slow death of starvation.

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    1. Your blog is well written Nolan.

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    2. Thank you for the comment Zeta!

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    3. You've described why life in the Internment Camps was hard quite well, Nolan!

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    4. I like the subjects.

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  29. IN THE INTERNMENT CAMPS

    World War Two was a tough time for Japanese. Having their own country putting them around a barb wire. The Americans weren't ready so the Americans put them in horse stalls on a horse track. Since there are a lot of stalls it fit the Japs. it was hard to live in the Internment Camps.

    PACKING FOR THE INTENMENT CAMPS

    It was hard to pack before going to the Internment Camps. The Japanese had 10 days to pack what you wanted and sell the rest. It was hard because there were a lot of things they wanted to take, but hey were only allowed to take what they could carry. Plus they couldn't take animals and they had to lower the prices on most things until people bought them. It was hard to decide what to take to the Internment Camps.

    LEAVING THE INTERNMENT CAMPS

    When the Japanese left the Internment Camps all they got was a card from the president saying, "Sorry we did this to you, we shouldn't have". They also got a $20,000 for the American's sorrow. That's why it was hard being a Japanese during World War 2.

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    1. I agree it was hard to live in the Internment Camps.

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    2. I agree. Making choices on what and what not to bring would be very difficult. I agree that life was tough behind barbed wire. I couldn't imagine having to go through saying goodbye to my pets. Hopefully a good friend would take care of them while I was interned.

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    3. Packing all the items in your house in just ten days? Do you think you could do that? Interesting last sentence, Will, referring to money for the American's sorrow.

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    4. Yeah, I didn't know how to phrase that sentence differently.

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    5. Thanks for commenting on my blog!

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    6. Interesting wording is GOOD! It makes people think. Nice job!

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    7. I like your structure, Will!

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  30. ¬I think what had the biggest impact on the Japanese when they were interned was the Japanese lost all of their possessions that they could not carry. The Japanese would have lost all of their possessions they could not carry to camp unless a friend or a neighbor agreed to keep some of their stuff. If a Japanese had a business, they would lose it when they left. A Japanese with a job would lose it and would not be able to get their job back because either someone else took their spot or since the Japanese were discriminated after they were released from the camps, the owner of the company the Japanese worked for, he/she could not give the Japanese his job back. Most the Japanese would not have their old house when they got out of the camps because they had to sell their house to someone. They would have to find a new house when they got out of the camps. If a Japanese person had a pet, they would either have to let them go onto the streets or they would sell their pets to someone. The Japanese would have to sell their furniture and cars to someone who wanted them. I think the biggest impact on the Japanese when they were interned was that they had to lose all of their possessions that they couldn’t carry.

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    1. I agree with your information and detailed. Your blog is great Declan!

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    2. The internment caused so many huge changes for the Japanese. You have highlighted them well, Declan.

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    3. Great job Declan! Your blog is very detailed!

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    4. Thank you very much you guys! You made me smile when I read the comments!

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  31. The biggest impact was that the Japanese were living in an internment camp for four years of their life. Kids who were in the internment camp didn’t get to go to school for a long time and missed lots of education until Japanese teachers made schools so children could still get their education. Most of the schools they made were only wooden log benches. The schools made it so the children could still gain knowledge. College students didn’t get their degrees even after they got out of the internment camps. The Japanese still could go back to college but most didn’t. They had to work so they could start a new life. Business owners had to sell their businesses because they wouldn’t get enough money to pay the taxes for the business. The Japanese’s houses were sold. After the Japanese got out of the internment camps they didn’t have houses or businesses and not enough money to buy a house for themselves. That is why I think the biggest impact for the Japanese was spending four years in a internment camp.

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    1. Great job Tavia! I like how you did your blog about education. Again great job!

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    2. Your blog is creative and inovative. Your conclusion is neat. Your big ideas and details flow together nicely. Check out Emelia and Josh's blog. They have a lot of creative information.

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    3. I really injoyed reading your blog.

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    4. Thank you for recomending my blog Zeta!

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    5. Your blog is well organized and you have done well to prove your Big Idea, Tavia. Sad that the internees didn't go back to college because they had to work to support their families. It was honorable, though.

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  32. I think that the biggest impacts that the Internment Camps had on the Japanese were the packing, the barbed wire fences, and the conditions in which they lived.

    Since the Japanese on the West Coast were going into Interment Camps, they had to pack. Trying to pack, was terrible. The Japanese had to sell their houses and most of their belongings, such as: beds, couches, dressers, tables, chairs, and their gardens. The worst part about packing was that sometimes, they didn't gain any money even though they were selling their items. Everyone knew that all of the Japanese on the West Coast were being sent to Interment Camps because there were posters about it everywhere. They also knew that the Japanese had to sell most of their stuff because they could only take what they could carry. Since they had to sell their possesions, the non-japanese people demanded lower prices, and because the Japaneses' stuff had to be sold no matter what, they couldn't refuse. So, the non-japanese could get a couch for $5, or even less. Sometimes they got things like beds for free, thanks to the Interment camps. Another problem was that the Japanese were not allowed to bring their pets along with them to the Internment Camps. Because of this, pets had to be adopted by friends. The pets were so sad that their owners had left that they wouldn't eat; causing them to be met with death.

    The barbed wire fences that gave the camp a border were a big problem. Even though they were just metal fences, they were deadly. Their were guard towers around the camp. Their were people in them, who were instructed to shoot anyone that looked suspiciously close to the barbed wire fence. And even though many internees were just having a walk, they looked like they were going to try and escape, because they were near the fence. These assumptions led to about 8 deaths because the internees weren't paying attention. The people in the guard towers shot the internees near the fence and the Japanese American that was shot was also killed in the process. An example in Journey to Topaz is when Mr.Kirihara and Mr.Toda were walking around looking for arrowheads in the sand. Because they were supposed to be found in the sand, the two men had to look down. Mr.Kirihara couldn't see ahead of him and then he accidentally wandered too near to the barbed wire fences so he was immediately shot and killed by one of the guards in the tower nearest him. This death had an impact on his wife, Mrs.Kirihara. She was all alone now that her husband was dead. She had a granddaughter named Emiko. They called her Emi(Ay-mee). However, Emi was in the camp hospital with Tuberculosis, which left no family members to accompany Mrs.Kirihara with her life. She was lonely.

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  33. The Japanese had to live in very bad conditions.In fact, they were deadly conditions. In Topaz, there were severe dust storms that blew sand into everyone's food, hair, and eyes. Their were pebbles that flew at your legs because of the dust storm; if they were wearing shorts or skirts, they could get seriously hurt. Even if the internees were inside their horse stalls/barracks, and there was a dust storm, the dust would still be able to get into the home because the walls didn't go all the way up to the ceilings. The Japanese Americans were taken to the Internment Camps so quickly that the builders of the camps didn't have enough time to finish the buildings, so they just covered them in tarp paper. Even then the tarp paper blew off allowing sand and pebbles to come flying through. The Interment Camp latrines ran out of water every now and then and there was absolutely no privacy in them. Them best people could do was to cover themselves with a cardboard box, or put a paper bag over their head. The laundry stations ran out of hot/cold water occasionally. The Japanese Americans inside of the camps couldn't eat snacks every now and then. There were only three meals, breakfast, lunch, and dinner. That was the rule. Standing in line just to get served for dinner could take up to two hours.

    The Japanese Americans that were taken to the Internment Camps were used to living in apartments/houses, but now they had to live in dirty, smelly, and unfinished horse stalls. The horse stalls were very disgusting and the floor was covered in hay and horse manure from the previous residents that lived in them. The people that were now living in these horse stalls had one thing to sleep on, metal cots. Ouch! They were lucky if they got a mattress, that the camp leaders gave them. But still, the mattresses were full of straw so they weren't very comfortable, and these people had to sleep on these beds every single night.

    When the campers were relocated to barracks, life was a little better. Except for one problem. They were super bored. Women solved that problem by arranging flowers. However, since they were in the middle of the desert, there were no flowers. So, they had to make the flowers out of paper. People also made life-sized gardens to surround their houses so they looked more lively.

    Living life in the Interment Camps was pretty rough.

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  34. I had to publish my blog in two seperate parts because it was way over 4,069 characters.

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    1. Wow Leina! Your blog is very detailed and well written. It left me in wonderment and awe.

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    2. Great information Leina. You have done a good job to show that the impacts you chose are truly ones that had a strong effect on the lives of the internees. You have learned a lot on this topic, and you've taught it to others now, too!

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  35. I think that the biggest impact on the Japanese in the internment camps was that once they returned from they had to work very hard to rebuild their lives. They lost their homes and businesses right before they were moved to the internment camps. That was a huge impact on them because when they came back from the internment camps they had no home to go back to, not very much money to buy anything they had sold, and no businesses to go back to to earn more money. Some had lost friends or family in the camps or in the war. Some lost both. Even if no one they knew died, someone they knew might still be injured from fighting in the war. Many Japanese were beaten while they tried return to their homes if they still had one. Even though few Japanese still had their homes, many who didn’t were still beaten. If they had pets it was likely that the pets were dead when the Japanese returned. Many pets died of starvation; they were so sad about not being with their owners that they wouldn’t eat and they died. The government sent an apology to the surviving Japanese 43 years later along with 20,000 dollars but I don’t think that was worth four years of their life. This is why I think that was the biggest impact on the interned Japanese.

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    1. I agree it was hard to rebuild their lives.

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    2. I agree, Ben. It was like coming home to NOTHING!

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    3. Strong ideas, Ben. You have done a good job to highlight the sad violence that the internees faced. That should not ever happen simply due to one's race.

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  36. HOW IT ALL STARTED: When the bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred on December 7, 1941, Japanese Americans’ loyalty to America was questioned. After being inspected, the FBI found that most Japanese Americans were loyal to America, but President Franklin Roosevelt ordered all Enemy-Aliens on the west coast into internment camps that were scattered around America. The Japanese were given only ten days to pack and could only take what they could carry.

    I think the biggest impact that the internment had on the Japanese Americans was losing their freedom and being treated like prisoners.

    HORSE STALLS: The Japanese were evacuated so hurriedly that the internment camps weren’t fully built. They were crammed into horse stalls until the camps were completely constructed. The horse stalls were small and reeked with the odor of horse manure. The Japanese Americans were forced to remove the manure from their “apartments”, as the horse stalls were not cleaned. The way I see it, the “apartments” were more like jail cells.

    THE CAMPS: The camps were still not complete as the Japanese moved in. The walls were a foot short of the ceilings,
    making it possible to have conversations with your neighbors, and making it impossible to keep a secret. The camps were often in places where people wouldn’t normally like to live. Deserts, and places such as Topaz, could have severe dust storms, and people always carried the risk of getting over heated. There was barbed wire along the perimeter of the camp. A watch tower over looked the camp with a man who watched for Japanese Americans that were trying to escape. If somebody did try to escape, the watchman would call out a warning, and if it wasn’t heard, they would shoot the prisoner trying to escape.

    CONCLUSION: After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were treated very poorly. Their liberty and freedom were taken away from the and they were unfairly accused of being disloyal to their country.

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    1. Your work is outstanding Catie! Your work is well written. I can't believe you wrote this amazing blog.

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    2. I agree Catie, the "apartments" were like jail cells!

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    3. Good comparison of life in the camps to life in prison, Catie. There are many parallels between the two, sadly.

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  37. BACKSTORY
    In the gold Rush California needed aliens, also known as Asians. They needed more aliens to do farm work. So they asked the Japanese if they would and more of them came to California. They got there and bought a swamp and cleaned the swamp. Then they turned the swamp into a nice farmland. Miners started getting angry at the Japanese, because they turned the miners bad land into a good land. The Japanese were treated worse, so they left and went somewhere else.
    MOVING INTO INTERMENT CAMPS
    I think the biggest impact on the Japanese is the fact that they mostly got mistreated by the United States. After Japan bombed Pearl harbor on December 7, 1941. All Japanese family's had to pack up all of the things they could physically carry. Pets were not allowed at the interment camps, that the Japanese family's were going to. Japanese family's had to give away their pets to strangers that they had to trust. Most Japanese pets that were given away died, because the pets would not eat. They would not eat , because they were very sad that their owner's left them. Some Japanese people did not believe that the Japanese had to go to interment camps. The punishment for not going to the interment camps, was a fine of $5000 and 1 year in jail.

    HOW IT WAS IN THE INTERMENT CAMPS
    The interment camps were extremely dry, because the interment camps were in the desert. There were a lot of sandstorms, and barley any plants. Since there were no plants, like flowers the Japanese would make flowers out of paper in the interment camps. Schools in the interment camps were very boring, because all grades were taught by the same teacher until the war was over. The food was poorly made for all the Japanese in the interment camps. The houses were covered with a lot of dust and the walls had cracks in them. The weather in the interment camps was brutal heat in the summer and freezing in the winter. The Japanese had a very hard time living in the interment camps.





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    1. Your blog is well written.

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    2. this my blog but on my dads account

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    3. Great backstory!

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    4. Nice connection with the history before internment. How did that connect with internment? You have good examples of mistreatment, Max.

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  38. I think the big impact was that the Japanese were sad that America put them in internment camps. Many Japanese were loyal to America but they were betrayed. They had only one chance to be loyal by joining the 442th regiment.They were only Japanese and they were the most decorated. Later America apologized for this.

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    1. I agree, Justin. If I were in a camp, I would have joined the 442nd regiment to prove my loyalty to America.

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    2. It must be hard to try to prove loyalty by fighting in a war.

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  39. BACKROUND INFORMATION
    The dislike for the Japanese started a near the end of the California Gold Rush. The Japanese came to Hawaii to get a job cutting down sugar cane. Then the Japanese bought farmland nobody wanted and turned it into healthy, working farmland. The Hawaiians got mad at the Japanese so they made the Asian Exclusion Law. That’s how the dislike for the Japanese started.

    THE BIGGEST IMPACT ON THE INTERES
    The biggest impact on the internes was being betrayed by their own country. Most Japanese were loyal to the United States of America. The first generation of Japanese to come to America, the Ise, weren’t allowed to become citizens of America. Their children, the Nise, on the other hand were United Sates citizens. When we put the Japanese in the internment camps, they put innocent people in jail. Which is against our Constitution. We put both Ise and Nise in the camps, so we put American citizens in jail. That’s why the biggest impact on the internes was being betrayed by their country.

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    1. Betrayal is certainly a strong impact, Lily. You have a good idea to share, here.

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  40. I think there are lots of impacts of the Japanese- American Internment Camps. The following are the top four impacts I came up with and my reasoning behind them:


    1. One impact of the internment camps that was all the Japanese- Americans had to give up most of their personal belongings. The Japanese- Americans entering the internment camps had to sell their homes and most of their belongings. The Japanese- Americans on the West Coast were forced out of their homes by United States officials. They were given ten days to pack, and were told to bring only what they could carry. When the Japanese reported to the assembly centers, however, they learned they would not be carrying their things into camp; trucks would haul their belongings to camp for them.


    2. Interning all the Japanese- Americans on the West Coast would potentially give them a reason to have lost trust in America. If I was ever interned by my own country, I would feel as if I didn't even belong there! I bet most Japanese- Americans may have felt the same way, too.

    3. Another impact was that in the internment camps, all of the Japanese- Americans lost most of their privacy. In the latrines, there were no stalls at all. I would not appreciate being stuck in a camp for four years(that is about how long they were interned) with no privacy in the bathrooms. Losing privacy would humiliate me! Luckily, the Japanese- Americans were innovative and came up with a solution. They put bags or crates/boxes over their heads so that the other people in the latrines did not know who they were. Though the solution offered some privacy, there were still some privacy issues in the internment camps.


    4. the Japanese- Americans were released from the internment camps in 1946. Forty-two years later, President Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act,which apologized to all the surviving Japanese- Americans on the West Coast who were interned. The surviving internees were issued official letters from the United States Government, apologizing for interning them and containing a check for twenty-thousand dollars. In my opinion, 20,000 dollars and an letter apologizing for the internment of the Japanese- Americans would not make up for being interned for four years by their own country.


    To sum up my ideas, being interned in the Japanese- American internment camps would not have been a fun experience.


    Written by John F.

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    1. I totally agree it would not be a fun experience.

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    2. Great job John! You have outlined many important impacts in this post. Your second one is an interesting one as no one has come up with an idea like that. I fully agree that a large amount of distrust would be created by interning the Japanese-Americans.

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  41. Impact of the Japanese Being Sent to the Internment Camps
    I think that the biggest impact on the Japanese being put into the internment camps, was that they lost most of their possessions, their homes, and their rights as citizens of the United States.
    I think that this was the biggest impact because the Japanese had to sell all of their furniture and their houses, and because they were in this situation, the Americans took advantage of this and would only take the Japanese possessions for very low prices. And when they finally got to the internment camps, all that was there was a small room with metal cots for each member of the family. For mattresses there was a sack stuffed with straw. There was no furniture whatsoever. So the families had to take apart crates or barrels and use the wood to build tools, and then use the rest of the wood to make the furniture with the tools.
    With so many people in the interment camps, there wasn’t enough crates or barrels for everyone. So if one isn’t quick, they probably won’t get the wood for the furniture.
    Conclusion
    This act of exclusion and unfairness against the Japanese was very unethical. It is not ethical to imprison citizens of one’s own state, and it’s against our constitution. Eventually the United States realized their mistake, and 20 years after the war, they sent out an official apology letter to every living internee signed by the president, with 20,000 dollars.

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    1. Good job, Jackson. You are right in that the rights of the Japanese were definitely impacted. To exclude them from society for all those years is a huge impact on the rest of their lives.

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  42. After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, our government sent the Japanese American citizens to the Japanese internment camps. I think the biggest impact on the Japanese Americans was losing most of what they owned. They had ten days to pack up only what they could carry and they could not bring their pets. They had to leave behind their houses, their businesses, and most their possessions.
    I think it was hard for them to pick what could be packed and what couldn't. The things that they couldn't bring were usually things they wanted, such as pets which mostly died while they were gone. It was really only the things they needed, like clothes, that they could take. They couldn't bring any family treasures or all the things in their house like their furniture. The kids could not bring toys with them. They could only bring a ball or marbles. The toy had to fit in their pocket.
    The Japanese were let out of the internment camps poor. They had nothing for food, they had no jobs and they had no money. Most of their houses and businesses were taken over and many of them were not allowed back in. If they went to the sheriff, the sheriff would help the people who had stolen the home instead of the Japanese. Everything they had worked for and earned before they were put in the internment camps was gone. I think it was not easy for them to have to start their life over again.

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    1. Good support for the impact you chose, Aidan. The idea that they could only take what they needed is a strong one. Where do you see that people stole their homes and that the sheriff didn't help? Your final sentence is an idea with which I agree.

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    2. I learned the sheriff thing at the California museum.

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    3. Was it true of every case or just some cases? That is important to note. There were always people who used their power for more than they should have, but there were people who empathized with the Japanese too, and they would make a different decision.

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  43. Another GREAT job of informing the world about something we have studied, 4th graders. You have shown insight and there has been some strong analysis of the situation. I hope that what you have learned carries over to your lives: treating people with respect and treating them properly is hugely important.

    I am impressed with some of the comments that some of you have left for your classmates. You have read the blogs thoughtfully and picked out some very nice things to say to one another. Kim Malthe-Bruun called for a world of human decency. Those of you who have commented positively have helped make that happen. I'm proud to be your teacher!

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  44. I am so glad my fellow classmates have the ability and knowledge to create these wonderful pieces of writing for anyone across the world to see.

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    1. I agree, Alexis. I really liked everyone's posts!

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  45. I really enjoyed Gary Paulsen’s book Woodsong. One of the reasons I really enjoyed Woodsong was that Gary was very descriptive. I could see what he saw at that time in my mind. However, sometimes in the book being descriptive was bad in my point of view. It was bad for an example, when he described the wolves ripping open the deer they had just caught, ripping out the guts, then licking their lips. Another reason I liked the book was that there was a lot of humor in it! Like when a little banty hen ruled over Gary Paulsen’s backyard. Also the banty hen, or known as Hawk in the book, intimidated everybody that went into the yard. So everybody was scared of him! Also when the Gary’s chickens were running around the chimney on Gary’s roof for warmth. Did I like the memoir genre? Yes. In fact, I think the memoir genre is one of the best ones. There are some parts that I like but some I don’t like. For instance, I liked the parts when Gray was describing the nature he was seeing. I liked that part because I love and enjoy nature in Sacramento, and to hear him talking describing the nature in Alaska, it was just wonderful. Also when another musher came up to Gary and said “Would you like a chocolate chip cookie?” and Gary gladly excepted it. I liked that part because that other musher was being so nice to Gary in one of the world’s toughest dogs sled races. The parts I did not like was when Gary had to run next to the dogs to build up body heat. However, Gary was not getting enough oxygen, so he took off the hood from his parka. Then Gary was choking on mucus, so he stuck his figure down his throat and the dogs turned around and started eating the mucus. That made Gary throw up, and the dogs starting eating that. I don’t like that because that is just plain old disgusting. So there are some bad parts but more good parts then bad. So over all, I think the book is very good. Did I think that Gary Paulsen was ignorant? Yes, I did think that Gary Paulsen was ignorant. Gary was being ignorant by in the training of the Iditarod Gary didn’t know the right food to give to the dogs. So, in punishment, Storm started having blood spew out of his backside. I think the book over all was very good.

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    1. Sorry Mr.LaMarr. Can you please deleat that post. I did is on the wrong one.

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